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The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956 - Image 5. July 1956. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/632/show/618.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1956). The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/632/show/618

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956 - Image 5, July 1956, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/632/show/618.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956
Contributor (Local)
  • Oates, Norma C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1956
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9841
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f005_007_005.jpg
Transcript Page 3 the middle of the island), by Leota Stilwell, et al. Horace Jeter of Shreveport and the writer pursued the bird for about an hour (between 6 and 7 p.m. CST), clearly noting the brownish, slightly forked tail at close range. The tail lacked the light tip of the Cassia's (sighted first and only time on Galveston by Geo. and Steve Williams 10-11-53), and the white sides of the Western (last seen on Galveston Island by the writer 5-6-56). Both Mr. Jeter and the writer had previously seen all three of these kingbirds elsewhere in Texas and both were able to carefully compare the field marks of the species with field guides and their own experience,while actually observing the bird itself. **************** MISCELLANEOUS CORRESPONDENCE Lt. Richard G. Rosche - Southwestern France May 10, 1956 - After spending next to a birdless summer, fall and winter in this section of southwestern France, this spring has been a most drastic change. Birding has been fabulous - in fact I have yet to find a place in the states that has a larger number of migrating birds going through it at one particular time. In the early mornings after dawn, the small scattered woodlots are just crammed with birdlife. perhaps the most interesting thing about this excellent migration route is that, so far, it has beenjeonfined to a certain number of particular species. The species list is not great, but the numbers are fabulous. Since many of the so-called warblers are not singing (same family as kinglets and gnatcatohers and not true wood warblers) many are difficult to identify in the field. Many European warblers can only be identified by voice and habitat. During March I had a wonderful opportunity to go to Germany for 10 days - and of course I took it, I was to attend a aeries of meetings in the Bavarian Alps - Berch- tesgaden to be exact. I just had bought a new ear and it was a pleasure to drive ^&* through all the snow and mountain roads. The Bavarian Alps were absolutely gorgeous - there was about 80 inches of snow on the ground at the time and every spruce tree and fir had a bit of snow on each branch. Truly, it was a real "winter wonderland". My pictures of the Alps turned out wonderful - in fact it was one of the best rolls of film I had ever exposed. They will all be brought back to Texas with me, and I do hope that you and some of the other Houston folks can see them sometime soon * * * On April 27, the long-awaited day arrived. I was promoted to 1st Lt. at lasts * * * present plans are to return to the University of Texas this fall - providing I can get released from the Army in time to make the beginning of the fall semester * * *." Mr. John L. Zimmerman, 7447 Stanwick Drive - (new O.G. member) June 14, 1956 - (Mr, Zimmerman, a newcomer to Houston was transferred to Ellington Air Force Base after completing hie pilot training in Oklahoma. He graduated from Michigan state College with a major in Zoology and continued on his master's work there until called by the Air Force to active duty. His graduate thesis will be in ornithology, most probably on the breeding phase of the catbird's annual cycle.) Some of his observations on birds in this area follow:- Red-throated loon - one individual in winter plummage observed on Offatt's Bayou, Galveston Island on April 21. Observed at approximately 50-100 yards, where with 7x35 glasses its merganser size and light coloration first hinted of its identification. Observation with a 40X telescope confirmed the identification to my satisfaction by clearly showing the seemingly upturned bill. This was a lifer for me, but I have had many occasions to observe the larger common loon in the Great Lakes area. Eared Grebe - observed on May 5 along the bridge to Hog Island. Record for April 21 on Galveston Island, Virginia Rail King Ra11 - March 27 at San Jacinto Battleground 26 on Hog Island. Purple Gallinule = May 5, Sheldon Reservoir Wilson's Phalarope - March 24 at Baytown Tunnel. Pileated Woodpecker - Just a joy to see so many aroundI Catbird - my thesis bird only a transient Yellow-throated vireo - one individual along the road to Lake Houston north of Sheldon Res. Seemed like an early date to me - March 10. Also white-eyed vireos same date for the first time. Golden-winged warbler = April 33 north of Gloverleaf on Ulvalde Road. That same day recorded a wide variety of migrants including these warblers: Black and White, Nashville, Yellow, Cerulean, Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided, Bay-breasted, Pine, Kentucky, Yellow-breasted chat, aad American Redstart. All this in about an eighth mile streteh ef roadside pine-oak woods. April 31-33 is the only time I observed anything that could really be classed as a migratory wave. Of course I believe this was the only time I and an ideal frontal system were in the same place at the same time. Black-poll warbler - April 31 on Galveston Island. A species that I considered a late migrant arriving toward the end of May in Michigan. Surprising to see it with the bulk of the spring warblers. Palm warbler - April 9 and 14 near Sheldon Reservoir.