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The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956 - Image 3. July 1956. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/632/show/616.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1956). The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/632/show/616

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956 - Image 3, July 1956, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/632/show/616.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 5, No. 3, July 1956
Contributor (Local)
  • Oates, Norma C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1956
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9841
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f005_007_003.jpg
Transcript Page 2 June 8 - A.Y. also reported the mockingbirds in his yard are now feeding nestlings from their third brood. June 10 - Joe Heiser and Vic Emanuel heard 35 species calling or singing at the Little Thicket Nature Sanctuary, including Hooded, Parula, Sycamore, Kentucky Warblers, a Yellow-breasted Chat, Hedseyed, White-eyed and Yellow-throated Vireos and Fish crows. June 16 - 17 Wood ibis at Lake on Highway 6, numerous Indigo and Painted buntings were seen in the Juliff area by Ruth Moorman and Leota Stilwell. June 23 - Thelma Smith, Leota Stilwell and Carrie Holcomb reported large flights of wood ibis in the Freeport area. July 1 - Oriole (species?) heard singing several times throughout the morning in the vicinity of 3010 Prospect in Houston by Noel Perley. Prairie Chickens Bill Jerr (Audubon warden for the bay area) reported about 100 prairie chickens near League City on the ranch of Mr. Waters Davis who heads the National Soil Conservation League. Greater Scaup Ducks A pair of Greater Scaup nested this spring on Lake Surprise (near Snith Point) reported by Bill Jerr (Audubon warden). Red-eyed Vireo Nest On June 24th Vic Emanuel and J„ M„ Heiser, Jr. discovered a vireo nest at the Little Thicket Nature Sanctuary, near "Enchanted Isle" in a hickory tree about five ft. above the ground. It contained two baby birds and two eggs. One of the babies had a few down feathers and was probably a couple of days older than the other. The youngest had no feathers and looked as though it had Just hatched. The eggs were white. We thought it might be a red-eyed vireo nest as we had heard one singing nearby and because it was a shallow hammock shaped nest unlike the deep sock-shaped nest of the white-eyed. We decided to wait until one of the adults returned to the nest. In about fifteen minutes we saw a bird in a nearby tree. It was a red-eyed vireo. We could plainly see the eye stripe, white underparts and vireo bill. The adult flitted around, afraid to come to the nest because of our nearness0 We stepped back a short distance and she settled on the nest. This was the first red-eyed vireo nest either observer had ever seen. Spoonbills '*,£ fi\J>o 9 On July 4, 1956, Carrie Holcomb, Ruth Moorman, Leota Stilwell and Norma Oates made a trip to the Bolivar Penninsula to see the spoonbills nesting on the islands in East Bay at Rollover (near Gilchrist), The most densely populated island is small, about 200 yards from shore and covered with low shrubby growth. Spoonbills were feeding in the shallow water at one end of the idland, others were perched in the low growth, and there was a constant movement of birds from this island to the other small islands in the vicinity. Young birds evidently just learning to fly, were moving around in the shrubs and also following the adult birds to the nearest islands„ Along the mainland opposite the islands are summer cottages, fishing camps, bait houses, etc. Fishing is popular in the ares and small boats of fishermen move between the islands all during the day. The spoonbills have used these islands for the past two or three years for nesting, and in spite of all outside disturbances, they seem to have laid their eggs, hatched and raised young. The people who live closest to the main nesting island are quite interested in the welfare of the birds, have assisted in erecting signs to keep boats from landing on the island, and in other ways have tried to keep the birds from being molested. The islands are under the protection of the Audubon warden and'areaim; process, of i beiag leased hy the National Audubon Society. (See letter from B.B.Watson, Tyler, 'Paget 4vr *giving^more\dat<,i>4»n:the)v islands) Purple Martins On July 4, 7:00 p.m. about 75 purple martins were seen perched on telephone wires back of a residence on the corner of University Blvd. and Momingside. At least 75 more were circling and milling overhead. A check was made again on July 6th at 7:00 p.m. and the birds were again lined up on the telephone wires and circling in the air. This may turn out to be one of the large gathering points for martins before their fall migration. Reported by N.Oates. Tropical (Couch's) Kingbird - (Noel Perley)(jSoe<_ Pe-n.^xMH*.") A tropical kingbird was positively identified on Galveston Island on June 17,1956, the first known record (as far as the writer can determine) for the Upper Gulf Coast of Texas. The bird was first spotted along 8-mile Road, 1/2 mile north of Stewart Road (West of Sweetwater Lake), where the road to Hance Bayou joins 8-mile Road (about