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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1925
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1925 - Image 1. May 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6300/show/6296.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1925 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6300/show/6296

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1925 - Image 1, May 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6300/show/6296.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 5, May 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_005_001.jpg
Transcript «_ta» THE ZEPHYR Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston/ Texas. May, 1925 Vol.2, No. 5 Who could observe a summer sunset fling Its flaming banners in the western sky At eventide/ and hear the woodthrush sing Its soft and wistful woodland lullaby; Or view," against the night's dark canopy/ A thousand worlds ablaze In boundless'space; Could feel the fury of the storm-swept sea, Or touch a flower's fragile, dew-veiled face, Behold -the grandeur of the mountain peak/ See insects march in countless caravan, Know Nature as it is," and then still seek To cherish ill against his fellow man? The Save The Redwoods League/ according to its Secretary, has seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars in gifts from interested people, donated for the purchase of particularly fine stands of redwood trees. Realization that thoughtful citizens are willing to "dig down in their pockets" in order that this generation may save and care for at least some portion of the wildwood heritage entrusted to our care, is a source of deepest satisfaction and encouragement to all earnest conservationists. But it is not the ancient, towering redwood tree alone that demands our consideration. What of that evergreen symbol of Yuletide joy and good will that brightens our winter woods with its glossy foliage and bright berries? In our Southern forests, there still exist wonderful groves of holly trees," which must sooner or later disappear before the ax and saw. Shall we "permit all of these natural wonders, gifts of a kindly Providence/ to . be dissipated before our eyes? It is well that nature lovers plant holly trees/ and urge rigid economy in the use of out sprigs and branches/ but this is not enough. What is a hill/ compared to a mighty chain of mountains, a fountain, compared to a roaring cataract? Where Nature has givenus natural wealth in massive bulk and magnificent proportions/ we should not think of the future's share in terms of ndckles and pennies." In this time of rapid development, there must be quick action/ while there is still opportunity. Who will secure for future Americans a worthy sample of the impressive Southern holly forests we are privileged to look upon/ and sot it aside untouched and unspoiled," as is being done in the case of the redwood trees/ in the West? In the January issue of "Natural-History", there is an appeal/ by Thomas li-jgett/ for the preservation of a wonderful virgin forest in Northwostern Pennsylvania. Almost every argu ment advanced by the writer/ in his convincing article/ applies' equally as well to the stretch of lake-studded wilderness along San Jacinto River now being advocated as a forest park for South Toxa.s, as the reader may judge from tho following brief excerpt: "On this property there are many, spots that are both unusual and spectacular. It is a place not only- recreational but educational. It has been well said that by keeping our people more closely in touch with na.ture we build a finer type of citizenship than is attained when they are surrounded uninterruptedly by the man-made environment of a city. This being true/ it is the more important that -spots such as Cook Forost should be preserved. Lord Ashfield, chairman of the London Underground Re.ilway system/ sees in tho automobile/ good roads/ and opportunity through them to get out and see the beautiful in nature, some of America's greatest antidotes to Bolshevism, and if this claim be valid, how- important it is that Cook Forest and simila.r tracts should be available for the use of the people!"