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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1925
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1925 - Image 1. September 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6240/show/6238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1925 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6240/show/6238

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1925 - Image 1, September 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6240/show/6238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 9, September 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date September 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_009_001.jpg
Transcript THE ZEPHYR Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, Texas. September, 1925 Vol. 2, No. 9 A haze on the far horizon, The infinite, tender sky, The ripe, rich tint of the corn-fields, And the wild geese sailing high; And all over upland and lowland The charm of the golden rod. Some of us call it autumn And others call it God. -r- Win. H. Carruth. "A Thing of Beauty Is a Joy Forever." One day last February, as three hiker_ were tramping across sandy hills and lake-studded swamps, tracing the course of the shimmering San Jacinto, a curious medley of sounds reached their ears, faintly at first, but becoming louder and louder as they trudged eagerly on, until at last they found themselves in the midst of a babel of bird songs and calls of many types, both shrill and musical, loud and faint, complex and simple, but in them all was a note of joy and, it seemed, thanksgiving, that lifted the eyes' of the ramblers - and then they knew what they had been too excited to observe before. Out of the gray, lifeless domain of winter, they had stepped into the temple of spring. Above them stretched a canopy of shining green, borne aloft on pillars of white marble. Silver sunbeams trickling through marked on the rugged foliage and sturdy trunks a maze of mystic patterns that changed with every breeze. Underfoot, the soft sod was strewn with jewels - large, oval drupes that had fallen from the rich clusters overhead. But still the strong branches swayed under their burden of fruit, and the whole forest seemed to breathe and stir as robin and-jay, bluebird and thrush, flicker and cardinal - a hungry host, feasted as bird never feasted before, at Mother Nature's banquet board. Those who have looked into the element-carved depths of the Grand'Canyon at sunset, or have seen the sun's rays fall upon the white, chaste majesty of the Taj Mahal, may understand the thoughts of the three privileged pilgrims in the midst of this primeval forest of holly trees. Even the sight of hacked and butchered skeletons by the roadside and piles of withered branches consigned to the trash- heap each Yuletide, cannot entirely erase from memory that picture of acre after_ acre of splendid trees, each a tower of glossy leaves, strong and'straight as a clean-limbed youth. And now, after this clumsy attempt to share a wonderful experience, we come to the purpose of our effort. The Outdoor "ature Club, in its campaign to "Save the Holly", wishes to help perpetuate, if possible, the custom of hanging a holly wreath in the window at Christmas, by conserving the supply until adequate provision can be made to insure its replenishment, but first of all. v/e hope to save for posterity the opportunity to enjoy a visit to those lands of enchantment and inspiration where myriad minarets of green flaunt the foliage of spring and the fruit of autumn high in the wintry gale and choirs of bird voices sing the glad refrain of Nature's own Christmas carol. A Fitting Memorial. There is no more fitting memorial for one whose life was dedicated to constructive endeavor than a forest. Hew York has chosen well, therefore, in dedicating a grove in which stand 10,000 pine trees as a testimonial of what Clara Barton did for mankind. This grove will bear the name of the founder of the American Red Cross for all time. -- Nature Magazine. The prime objective for which I feel we should strive is to endeavor to make available for the average American outdoor recreation, with all that it implies, and to preserve our facilities for outdoor recreation for our children and our children's children. -- Calvin Coolidge.