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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 1, January 1925
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 1, January 1925 - Image 1. January 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6196/show/6192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 1, January 1925 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6196/show/6192

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 1, January 1925 - Image 1, January 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6196/show/6192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 1, January 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_001_001.jpg
Transcript THE ZEPHYR Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, , 5 ?exas, January, 1925 Vol. 2 , ;no. i When winter winds are piercing chill, And through the hawthorn blows the gale, With solemn feet I tread the hill That overbrows the lonely vale.- Chill airs and wintry winds.' My ear Has grown familiar-with your song; I hear it in the opening year, I listen, and it cheers me long. --. Longfellow. Our Dixie Troubadour- . St Still another title for our familiar friend of the trim gray coat and graceful manners. He has as many names as a foreign nobleman, and yet he is the very essence of democracy, with all his fine style and.genteel airs. We, who know him so well, are content to call him the Mockingbird, but others, to whom the sound of his matchless song is a rare treat, have showered honors upon him. His fame has spread across the seas, where he is known as the American Nightingale. In America, he has been dubbed the Minstrel of the South, and he is in truth a feathered music-box. One of the best descriptions of our talented neighbor of the fields and woods is that given by The Mentor: "America has a bird called a thrush that is not a thrush, - the mocking thrush or mockingbird. It is the most wonderful" of all songbirds. Incomparable seems to be the.only word fully defining the rare beauty of the song of this nun-coated minstrel. He has a wonderful song of his own; but he is not content with that; he mimics the songs and.cries of every other bird. He can imitate the nightingale's song, the harsh shriek of the eagle, or the cackle of poultry. He. can bark like a dog, or mew like a cat. He can imitate the sound of a saw, the creaking of rusty hinges, or the blows of a hammer and mallet. But he never imitates the human voice. The singing mood is as likely to seize him in the night hours as'in daylight. Silhouetted against the moon, - for he seldom sings until the moon has' risen, - from the top of a magnolia he fills the shadows with ringing notes fairly quivering at times with ecstasy of'feeling. The mockingbird is common in America, and is much prized for his wonderful song and admired for his courage. He is about ten inches long, and may bo recognized by his slender body, long legs, and long tail. Though the range of the mockingbird is usually confined to the southern states, a few venturesome individual- roam as far north as Connecticut and Massachusetts. More and more visit the North every year, and It may be that the future will find this feathered Patti more numerous north of Mason and Dixon's line." Though Texas has not yet chosen from its myriad feathered inhabitants a state bird, we can make no mistake in proclaiming as our own a songster whose merits have been so universally acclaimed.