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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1926
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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1926 - Image 1. May 1926. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6178/show/6174.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1926). The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1926 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6178/show/6174

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1926 - Image 1, May 1926, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6178/show/6174.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1926
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1926
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9624
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f029_005_001.jpg
Transcript THE ZEPHYR Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, Texas May, 1926 Vol. 3, No, ^ 0 Sweet the dropping ove, the blush of mora, The starlit sky, the rustling fields of corn, The soft airs blowing from the freshening seas, The sunflecked shadow of the stately trees, The mellow thunder and the lulling rain, The warm, delicious, happy summer rain, When the grass brightens and the days grow long, And little birds break out in rippling songl — Celia Baxter. Probably no official action on the selection of a state bird for Texas will be taken until the next session of the Legislature, but interest in the subject continues to increase as citizens in different sections of the state advance arguments in behalf of their favorite among our many song and insectivorous birds. The mockingbird seems to be the choice of a great majority because of its range across the entire state, its friendly attitude towards man, and its fame as the world's greatest songster. Next to the "English" sparrow, which is of course ineligible, it is our most abundant bird. The possibility that other states may choose the same bird that we name should have no bearing on the matter. Louisiana and Mississippi'have the same state flower - the Southern magnolia - and no less than four states have selected the violet as their floral emblem. Our problem is to decide upon the bird that is most typical of Texas - one that is found in all parts of the state and that is acknowledged the world over as a leader. There Is some sentiment in favor of the scissor-tailed flycatcher, or Texas blrd-of-paradise. The cardinal, too, has its advocates. But the scissortail, though in other respects a most admirable bird, has no song, and the cardinal is a shy fellow unknown to many who hail the mockingbird as friend. Whatever the final decision may be, the Outdoor Nature Club professes its willingness to abide by it, and calls upon all nature lovers within the broad boundaries of our state to express their choice, to the end that Texas may have a state bird that is indeed worthy of the name. The names of the authors of the prize winning poems in our nature poetry contest will be announced as soon as the decision of the judges is known, and will be published in the June issue of this bulletin. Hundreds of verses have been received, from city and village and farm, across the entire stretch of the five states embraced in the contest. Many of the poems possess real literary ■raluej and all manifest a spirit of understanding or reveal a -tartam chawn of expression that disarms criticism*