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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 2, June 1978
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 2, June 1978 - Image 1. June 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 3, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/613/show/601.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1978). The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 2, June 1978 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/613/show/601

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 2, June 1978 - Image 1, June 1978, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 3, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/613/show/601.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 2, June 1978
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVII, No. 2, June 1978
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9863
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f001_006_001.jpg
Transcript 2 fcaa sb=s> Volume XXVI I, No. 2 June, 1978 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP, OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB, HOUSTON, TEXAS COMING EVENTS June & July There will be no OG meetings or field trips. June 25 Deadline for SPOONBILL articles, notices, etc. (We are looking forward to some accounts of birding experiences from you early vacationers). July 3 Deadline for Clearing House (Earlier If possible). July 1-14 HAS tour to Washington S+a+e and the Pacific Northwest. This would be a great vacation: beautiful scenery, bird specialties of +he area, three experienced naturalists to lead you—a cool escape from the heat and humidity of our upper Texas coast summer. P.O.Box 19687, Houston, 77024. SPRING MIGRATION ON THE UTC by Jim Morgan In early April Margaret Jones asked me to do an analysis of the 1978 spring migration on the UTC. Margaret's request was stimulated by many people asking her "where are the birds?" She remembered that in early April, 1977, the same question was being repeatedly asked, and, therefore, she felt tt might be worthwhile to put this year's migration in perspective. When we think of migration we often describe bird movements and associated events with the terms "fallout", "push", and "wave". In general a "fallout" Is a rapid Increase In the number of birds tn a local area (generally a migrant trap) usually caused by turbulent weather or a rainy cold front. In just one or two hours a small patch of woods starting with 100 or less migrants can be deluged with birds until 1,000 or more birds are swarming in the trees and underbrush. The migrants literally "fallout" (seek cover) from the effects of the adverse weather. A "push" of a migrant species Is a build up of 20-30 Individuals (for most species; more or less for more common or scarce species) of this particular species, the numbers being less than what a fallout brings. A "wave" of migrants usually Is any noticeable Increase of migrants in a given area. The period of the wave can vary as can the number of birds In any "wave". A wave generally has less birds per species than a push but the varie+y of species is often quite good. The above terms Just defined are obviously variable, relative, and very subjective unless one Is careful to count birds accurately and record the results. A good migration (for the birder) Is one that can be defined by saying that a lot of birders saw lots of birds, or more precisely, birders observed a few fallouts and numerous good pushes and waves during the migration. Fred Webster, commenting In American Birds about the 1977 spring migration, stated that "a poor migration may be defined as one In which birders are more conspicuous than birds." A quick review of the 1977 spring migration on the UTC is in order. Generally, the shorebird migration was rated good, but the passerine migration poor—at least most of the time. Two good fallou+s, two or three strong pushes and a few more waves of passerines were all that were observed in Spring, 1977. Most observers t'elt the migration was one to two weeks late and there was good data to support this observation. Now, on to Spring, 1978. March started off normal enough with a sprinkling of migrants found on the coast during the first two weeks. The first strong cold front came through the night of March 23 and a cold northwest wind was blowing early the following morning. This day, March 24, was the best shorebird day this observer ever witnessed. A count of 25,000 shorebirds was made that day at High Island, Bolivar Flats,.and on Galveston Island. Included were 300 Piping Plovers, 1,500 Dunlins, 1,500 Long-billed Dowitchers, 500 Least Sandpipers and 5,000 Sandpiper species. Passerines were conspicuously absent that day, but on the following day,