Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1926
Image 1
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1926 - Image 1. October 1926. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6122/show/6120.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1926). The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1926 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6122/show/6120

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1926 - Image 1, October 1926, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6122/show/6120.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1926
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1926
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9624
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f029_010_001.jpg
Transcript THE ZEPHYR Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, Texas. October, 1926 Vol. 3, No. 10 To climb the trackless mountains all unseen, With the wild flock that never needs a fold; Alone o'er steeps and foaming falls to lean; This is not solitude; 'tis but to hold Converse with Nature's charms, and view her stores unroll'.d. Byron. We have stood alone at dawn on the granite crest of Pike's Peak, beholding the abysses freshly tinted by the rising sum. We have experienced the sublime thrill of rambling through the painted, spray-filled valleys and snow-decked heights of Glacier National Park, over Piegan Pass, Swift Current Pass, up Old Baldy, skirting Avalanche Lake, with its shining cascades springing thousands of feet from Sperry's Glacier; trod the August snow of that splendid glacier that lay luxuriantly in the golden, purple, red and white mountain meadows. We have wandered amid the mightiest of Sequoia in California, with their silences and splendid, endless aisles. We have tramped alone through the uplands of Yose- mite, along the cloud-racked precipices, and dangled our feet from the topmost granite tip of Half-Dome; have seen, as the eagle sees, the green-clad valley of enchantment from that lofty height, with Its monster, wispy waterfalls. We have entered, afoot and alone, the rocky promontories, to feast on the encompassing, breath-taking grandeur of color, distances, outlines and depths of the Grand Canon of the Colorado. We have toiled up and conquered all the great mountains of Hawaii; over the lofty crests of the islands of Molokai and Lanai, through bogs to the summits of Eke and Kukui, and stood amazed on Haleakala's awful brink on Maui; and trudged 200 miles and more on one grand outing, over the summits of Haulalai, Mauna Kea (13,605 feet, and loftiest of all oceanic mountains), and finally, Mauna Loa (13,675 feet), the world's mightiest living volcano, on the island of Hawaii. In all these wanderings, and others that loom through the mists of memory, we have experienced the sublime thrill of the lover of nature. We have always felt that there are certain heights and remote, hidden places on earth, set aside as sacred to their Creator, and only to be sensed and beheld by those willing to make the supreme physical effort; that these sacred precincts were never to be attained without sacrifice, the sacrifice of physical comfort, possibly of human safety, as atonements for the sublime pleasure of their ultimate vision. In this final attainment, he who toils afoot through the depths and heights becomes as one with all the wild, untrammeled animal and vegetable world about him, and in this he becomes quite truly a child of God. Finally, when we have lifted the veil from before the sanctum sanctorum of nature, viewed the marvelous wonders there beheld, we