Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 3, March 1995
Image 1
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 3, March 1995 - Image 1. March 1995. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6119/show/6111.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1995). The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 3, March 1995 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6119/show/6111

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 3, March 1995 - Image 1, March 1995, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6119/show/6111.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 3, March 1995
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1995
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 17
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9880
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f017_003_001.jpg
Transcript The Volume 44, No. 3 Marck 1995 Spoonbill Published by The Ornithology Group, Outdoor Nature Club, Houston "Pelagic trips are not for everyone... those who do, know the thrills and the agony inherent in pelagic b irding. ..The pelgic birder may have to endure lengthy stays at sea, constant spray, long periods without seeing birds, rough seas and seasickness. So, why do we do it?" Ckairinan's Message by David Bradford Pelagic trips are not for everyone. Those who do make a habit of seeking birds of the deep blue waters beyond the continental shelf, know the thrills and the agony inherent in pelagic birding. During the last four or five years, the Gulf of Mexico has revealed it "rich" avifauna to determined birders. Compared to the west and east coasts, the Gulf of Mexico is considered an avian void. There are trips I have taken on the Gulf that produced nothing. I mean, flat out, nothing. Then there are the trips like the one I took in August of last year. Nine species of pelagic birds were seen on calm seas. In 19881 took my first pelagic trip to the Channel Islands off southern California. The following year I birded Kodiak Island out of Homer, Alaska. It was not until 1991 that I endured my first trip in the Gulf of Mexico aboard the sluggish Scat-Cat. Since then I have ventured into the Gulf on both rough and calm seas at least eight times and plan to go at least twice this summer. There are others who have birded the Gulf for over twenty years and will join us this summer for more pelagic birding. With the use of smaller and faster boats and an increase in trip length, we are now able to stay out in deep water longer than in the past. We see pelagic birds on many trips. Last year we grew to expect two species of storm-petrels and two species of shearwaters. Most of the time we were not disappointed. Of the four pelagic trips out of Port O'Connor last year, Leach's and Band-rumped Storm-Petrel were seen on all four trips. Bridled Tern and Audubon's Shearwater were seen on two trips. Cory's, Greater and Sooty Shearwater were seen just once. Cory's are to be expected more in autumn—October and November. The sighting of a Greater or Sooty Shearwater off the Texas coast is presently considered very rare. If sargassum weed lines can be found, the chances of finding a Bridled or Sooty Tern are good. Bridled Terns use the weed as perches. Associated with weed lines are various prey species used by both terns. If a tropicbird is to be found, it will probably be associated with a weed line. A Texas Parks and Wildlife crew reported a yellow-nosed albatross flew directly over their boat January 9,1995. They were taking marine samples only five nriles off Port (Chairman's Message continues on page 7)