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The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961
Image 8
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961 - Image 8. April 1961. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6101/show/6096.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1961). The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961 - Image 8. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6101/show/6096

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961 - Image 8, April 1961, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6101/show/6096.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. X, No. 12, April 1961
Contributor (Local)
  • Deshayes, Mabel
  • Deshayes, Bob
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1961
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9846
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f015_004_008.jpg
Transcript Page 8 "A"5 (Dr. & Mrs. George Lowery ( Horaee Jeter - Shreveport (Jim Stewart - Shreveport (Charlie Mclntire (John O'Neill (Nancy & Jerry Strickling MARCH REPORT SUMMARY - Bayshore Areas by Linda Snyder Migrants are very alow in coming into the area. With the first week of March, there was ax considerable reduction in numbers of wintering birds, such as Blue-Gray Gnateateher, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, House Wrens, Orange-erowned Warblers and Goldfinches. However, before they left^ most of these gave forth their songs reminiscent of their nesting grounds. As always, the beautiful flute-like song of the Hermit'Thrush is the most' thrilling. I heard for the first time the halting song (similar to Red- eyed)) of the Solitary Vireo. The Brown Thrasher has been competing with the Mockingbird in more gutters! fashion, and the Ruby-crowned Kinglet lets himself be known by his little "hunting song". I also heard the cry of the Common Loon for the first time at Texas City Dike. The water birds are still making » big splash with the Glaucous Gull still at the Dike on March 31 and the ap pearanee at duRbnt Pond of ai female Common Merganser. Clint and I identifiedhsr March 28 by the wall-defined area: of red and the white patch on the throat, the greater amount of white in the wing, the crested head and th* stradghter bill. Later we showed her to Paul Corneil who made an attempt to photograph her. +r+ + + -tt +r # -H- +f * + PELAGIC BIRDING: by Clint Snyder On February 26, 1961, the Ornithology Group undertook its first pelagic bird trip. Departure was scheduled for 8:00 aim. from Bier 18 in Galveston; however because of engine failure on the "Miss &me", it was an hour before we could get a replacement - ax striking red aad yellow excursion boat, "Captain Doc". We were extremely fortunate since this boat with its floored upper deck was much more adaptable to birding. While waiting for the replacement, we watched the gulls and pigeons flying around the piers against"aaclear blue sky. There had been ahlustering norther; however, by now the wind had dropped to aagentle breeze from SSW, and the temperature was in the high 50's» The trip finally got underway at 9!00 as the group of intrepid birders boarded the "Captain Doc". In order to start attracting the gulls> we immediately began throwing out part of the 20-odd pounds of bait (suet, popcorn, fishheads and chicken entrails). After about a mile, we had attracted a tremendous cloud of Laughing Gulls (causing some of those on board to seek protection for their heads). Passing the Galveston docks was quite interesting as Captain Doe gave an authoritative narration on the maritime environment of Galveston. We plowed through the relatively muddy waters of Bolivar Roads with porpoises lazily rolling ahead of us in the stin. -As we passed the lighthouse, a pair of Eared Grebes and a-Common Loon were seen in the surf at the end of' the jetties. Little did we know that these would be the 3ast waterfowl we would see on the trip. We found no dueks in the Gulf2 The transition from bay to gulf water was quite pronounced,., as the water became a clear blue-green in color. Flowing along at a top speed of 10 mph, we trailed behind us a string of gulls - mostly Laughing, a: few Herring, and £0i occasional Bonapartes. A Caspian Tern at about 5 miles out was an unusual bird. As we approached the 10 mile distance, the composition of the flock of gulls changed, with Hering Gulls replacing most of the Laughing Gulls until at 12 miles we had a floek of 50+ Herring Gulls:-and only an occasional Laughing. By this timesDst of the people aboard were becoming used to the rooking of the ship, and all had their sea»legs. The novelty of scanning the horizon, and the practicality too, had worn off until at 17 miles, Jerry and Nancy Strickling exclaimed almost in unison "What's that birdJ* as ax large brown-colored bird swooped in from starboard and had crossed our stern before most people could see it. Graciously the bird recircled the boat and identification was tentatively established as an immature Blue-faced Booby. (There has been some doubt expressed as to the identity of1ne bird. It was definitely a member of the Sulidae, and to this observer it appeared definitely smaller than the adult Gannet. The coloration was a uniform brown (not mottled), and lighter patches were on the rump and top part of the head or back. It is best that it be listed as unidentified.) As Linda Snyder was watching the bird she saw another larger, white bird in the distance. This bird was spotted a few seconds later by the rest of the party and was identified as an adult GANNET. Even though the bird never came very close to the boat, the fact that' it was an adult made its identification possible. If it had been an immature, it probably