Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961
Image 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961 - Image 3. April 1961. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6101/show/6091.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1961). The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6101/show/6091

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961 - Image 3, April 1961, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6101/show/6091.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 12, April 1961
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. X, No. 12, April 1961
Contributor (Local)
  • Deshayes, Mabel
  • Deshayes, Bob
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1961
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9846
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f015_004_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3 The floek flushed. I caught the cinnamon color of the under-wings. The other three, to my chagrin, did not. Charlie was at another angle taking pictures. The bird settled in some 300-400 yards away. Again, away we crawled - dodging the natural hazards but not the grass burrs. Nancy and Jean were on the side lines urging Charlie to get a picture of four grown men on their bellies chasing a bird - particularly when one was the current president of the A.O.U., one a CPA, and the third a Research Engineer (I'm a bird-watcher). Again we neared the flock and studied the leg color. Dr. Lowery eould see the small Curlew was only two-thirds the bulk of the Whimbrel and eould .almost walk under the belly of the L.B.Curlew. The small curlew had very dark, slate gray lets. The L.B.. Curlew and Whimbrel had decidedly bluish legs. Suddenly Dr. Lowery stood up saying, "Jeter, there is no doubt in my mindo" The bird flushed and the rest caught the cinnamon underwing color. They had already seen the very buffy flanks and the spottings -which covered the little curlew. It was now nearing 4:30 p.m. I had been stooping and crawling since 8:30 a.m. with few rest periods and was quite tired. We left our bird, reluctantly, and took on refreshments. Dr. Lowery had brought with him a skin of an Eskimo Curlew taken in 1889, the 3ast Louisiana record, and of a Whimbrel. We studied them. We were even more certain of our current sight record. Dr. Lowery is as reasonably certain, as a scientist can be without collecting,that this is an Eskimo Curlew. Dr. Lowery added that he could not conceive that this was the same bird seen in previous years - there must be several. - Jerry B. Strickling Dear Ed: With all this excitement about Numenius arquatus this past week, I became inquisitive and paid a visit to the library. What I found may prove to be of interest to you, too. This is taken from NATURAL HISTORY OF BIRDS by Leonard W. Wing, Copyright 1956: "Hpw many birds have become extinct since the Industrial Revolution is a question that cannot be answered with certainty. Sixty or more island f armshave become extinct at the hands of man throughout the world; fewer have become extinct on continental land. Nine forms of continental American birds have become extinct since the English settlements in America, with probable date of extinction as follows: Great Auk 1853 Louisiana 1 Paraquet 1904 (?) Ballus Cormorant 1852 Eskimo Curlew 1930 Labrador Duek 1878 Townsend Bunting 1832 Heath Hen 1932 Passenger Pigeon 1898 (1914) Carolina Paraquet 1904 ESKIMO. CURLEW:: Audubon visited Labrador in 1832-and gives us this description of their numbers:: "The accounts given of these birds borders on the miraculous. They arrive in such numbers: to remind me of the Passenger Pigeon". In spring they migrated northward through the continental interior. The great flocks were decimated at all seasons of the year (save possibly on some of the nesting grounds) from Labrador to Argentina and back through the interior of North America. By 1890 only a few scattered flocks were reported anywhere. The last individuals reported are about as follows! Ohio, 1878; Michigan, 1883j Indiana, 1890; Wisconsin, 1912; Argentina, 1925; and Nebraska* 1926. Uneonf irmed but evidently reliable reports have placed Eskimo Curlews in Labrador as late as about 1930 and probably a few scattered elsewhere during the following year," An ardent admirer and reader, M.D. EDITORIAL, More about curlews — mostly Eskimos. The credit for this find of the century goes to TREVOR BEN FELTNER for his alertness in spotting and identifying it initially in 1959. Let's not forget this in our current enthusiasm. VIC EMANUEL most be praised for his energies in helping to keep the project alive, for pushing, for the 1959 AUK article by Dr. Geroge Williams, for the I960 search with CARL AIKEN and STEVE WILLIAMS and finding the birds. In 1961w mst give thettmost credit to HARVEY PATTEN. Alone and never having seen the bird before, he found it at 31:15. a.m. on March 31, 1961. He contacted the land owner, discussed protection of the bird, and made arrangements for a party to photograph the bird thensxt day. To all in the past our humble appreciation. To Harvey, thanks a million, and to