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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977
Image 13
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977 - Image 13. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/61/show/57.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977 - Image 13. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/61/show/57

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977 - Image 13, May 1977, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/61/show/57.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVI, No. 1, May 1977
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9862
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f028_005_013.jpg
Transcript Page 13 u+es later I did see It with 7x50 binoculars at 30 feet in full sun in a nearby blackberry thicket. On April 8 In the same riparian area I heard what may have been one of the call notes, and I perhaps saw a winter wren there on April 17. One or two winter wrens have been at White Oak Bayou all winter, and I have become very familiar with the appearance, behavior, and call of the species, as compared to those of the house wrens also there. —Wesley Cureton Wren, Bewick's: Originally seen and identified by Joyce Norman, Helen Holmberg and Martha Ballard. Singing typical Bewick's call—range about 20yards—I Ight bright overcase. Dark patternta11, white throat, chest and belly, heavy white eyestrlpe. Observed with 7x35, lOx binoculars. —Larry Ballard Thrush, Hermit: Rust tall, brown back and spotted chest. Smaller than nearby Wood Thrushes. Raised tail and dropped it several times. Bird seen In Boy Scout. Woods by Penny Cureton. —Jim Morgan Vireo, Warbling: Dull brownish gray above, Ivory below, no wingbars, vireo bill but more active than I expected, lacked bluish cap of Red-eyed Vireo and Tennessee Warbler. White eyestrlpe noticeable but not strongly so. Seen In pecan tree near suburban slough near Richmond, distance to 15 feet, 4 p.m., light overcast, 7x35 binoculars. —George Howe. Warbler, Brewster's: This warbler was found in Smith's Woods among numberous other warblers. The first striking feature was the large yellow wing patch. The back was gray and the head had a yellow crown and forehead. Quite noticeable was the complete lack of the black ear and throat patches of the Golden-winged. Instead, this bird had a hint of a black line through the eye, but not as distinct as most Blue-wings. The throat, chest and belly were pure white, with no sign of a yellow breast band. After double checking the field guides to verify that the yellow breast band Is often missing I felt safe In concluding that this bird was a Brewster's. The bird was seen at 20 feet'for 6-10 seconds In good light with 8x40 binoculars. —Jim Morgan Warbler, Prairie: Green above with brownish streaks on back. Yellow below with large, black streakings on the sides. Yellow line above the eye, black line through the eye and below the eye. Pale wingbars. Wagged its tail. Saw bird at eye lovel from 5 to 10 feet as I tried to "Pish" it into the car! —David Dauphin Warbler, Mourning: Gray-hooded male was black at upper breast, yellow below, olive above, had a broken eye-ring. Seen in good light with 10x50 binocs at 50 feet. — David Dauphin Grosbeak, Black-headed: Originally seen and Identified by Ann Atkins and Larry Ballard. Female - high in tree - bright overcast. Range about 35 feet. Buff breast, very little streaking on sides near wings only, buff stripe through the eye. Observed with 7x35 and 8x50 binoculars. —Larry Ballard Towhee, Spotted: This was a female bird with chocolate-colored head, back and throat. Lower chest and belly were white and sides were rusty. Wings were dark brown with heavy shoulder spotting. Tail dark brown with white outer corners. Seen at 30 feet with 8x40 binoculars for one minute In excellent light. —Jim Morgan. Sparrow, Le Conte's: Seen in flight from marsh buggy. Yellowish appearance ruled out darker Sharp-tailed and Seaside Sparrows. Sparrow size, shape, flight, ruled out both Marsh Wrens. —Noel PettingelI. Sparrow, Lark: Observed over 30 of these beautiful sparrows In freshly-plowed field in Ft. Bend Co. The field was rather large, and although I could positively Identify only 30 individuals, I'm sure there were many more In the area. The singing males would perch on a telephone line at the front of the field. At one time I observed 8 Individuals on the line simultaneously singing their incredibly lyrical songs. Quite remarkable.—Ted Eubanks, Jr. Junco, Cerk-eyed (Slate-colored): These two birds were found at City Hall, first in an oak tree then they tlew to the grass. They had gray heads with black around the eyes. Gray back with some rusty on upper back. Light gray underparts with a wash of light salmon color on sides. White outer tall feathers clearly seen In flight. Light, pink bill. Seen at 8:00 a.m. in good light for 3 minutes with 8x40 binoculars. —JIm Morgan Junco, Dark-eyed (Slate-colored: Three Dark-eyed Juncos observed at City Hall; Slate-colored race; gray heads, backs, and breasts, although some pink noted on sides of one individual (immature); pink bills; dark tails with white outer rectrlces; birds first attracted my attention with their characteristic shrill whistle; first time recorded at City Hall by either Wes Cureton or myself. — Ted Eubanks, Jr.