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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977 - Image 5. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/61/show/49.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/61/show/49

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977 - Image 5, May 1977, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/61/show/49.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVI, No. 1, May 1977
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9862
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f028_005_005.jpg
Transcript Page 5 ** Doris Winship of Rockport, with whom the editor chatted briefly at High Island last month, passed along some distressing information about the "birding climate" in the Rockport area. Rockport, almost solely due to Connie Hagar, became famous as a Mecca for birds and birders, and the residents were quite proud of their town's fame. However, that bloom is fading rapidly due to the gross ineonsideration of some people who are so eager to "see the birds" they ignore all courtesy and consideration due property owners. And we alI suffer because of the lack of manners of a few. Please, do not enter property without permission; if you have permission do not abuse it by thoughtless acts (for Instance, what farmer would be happy with a bunch of birders straggling across his freshly planted field). PLACES TO GO ** Unfortunately, this is news of a place to not go. Due to construction activities at the Dow Wilderness Trail in Lake Jackson, visitors are asked to not enter. At this time it is not known whether Dow will reopen a portion of the Trail when construction is completed. We will keep you informed of any new developments. ** Rice fields, In preparation or planted, can still be rewarding. For instance, Margaret Anderson and the_editor found 17 Hudsonlan Godwits in a puddle in a muddy field on Stockdick Road in West Harris County on May 4. And that same day, while checking a rice field where the rice was already 10 or 12 inches high, Margaret Anderson caught a quick but convincing glimpse of a Black Rail as It rose, fluttered a few feet, then dropped out of sight (the editor, to her chagrin, was looking the other way!). There were many White-rumped Sandpipers (one Baird's) that day, also. ** In checking past Clearing Houses it seems the beaches and the parks (Memorial, Bear Creek, Spring Creek, etc.) were birded the most in late May and during June. Probably picnicking and birding were being combined! Looking for nesting birds, newly fledged birds, particularly marsh and shore birds, can provide a delightful birding experience. RESULTS OF HAS' BIG DAY RUN April 23, 1977 Pa rtIcI pa nts: Total species: 221 Team I: Jim Morgan, Bob Moulton,Glenn Cureton, Penny Cureton — saw 167 species Team 2: George & Jane Clayton, Ted & Janet Eubanks, Rich. Goldfarb — saw 168 species Team 3: Holly Hobart, Debbie DeKeyzer: saw 142 species "Team 4": Noel Pettlngill: saw 140 species Team 5: Judy & Roger Novak: saw 88 species Team 6: Jamie Leverette, Cindy Howard (novice birders): saw 52 species "Team 7": Tom Collins: 128 species Every team had "exclusive" sightings, High Island, Houston south to coast. area covered was from Freeport area east to NEW BIG DAY ROUTE PRODUCES ONE-PARTY TOTAL OF 178 SPECIES by Noel PettingelI On April 30 David Dauphin, Ted Eubanks, Jr.', Paul Nimmons, and the writer attempted an all-out assault on the Upper Texas Coast Big Day Record of 194 species (incl. Rock Dove and Boat-tailed and Great-tailed Grackles) established on April 22, 1971 by a party of 5 (182 species identified by every observer). But instead of following the traditional Sheldon/Anahuac/High I./Bolivar routes, the 1977 group began their Big Day at the battleship "Texas" where two "staked-out" owls were confirmed by 4:45 a.m. (CDT)—Barn (nesting in the ship) and Screech. Next stop was the Houston Lighting & Power Cooling Ponds and Cotton Bayou marsh area in NW Chambers County where two more owls were found (Horned and Barred),, along with unusually late Ring-necked and Canvas- back ducks, and both cormorants. White Memorial Park at 1-10 and Tex. 61 was next along the route and here essential woodland species were added among which were a late Brown Creeper and 8 kinds of warblers, including Swalnson's, Anahuac NWR was the next major birding area and, thanks to a 45-minute marsh buggy tour (with Ed Jackson at the wheel), we saw 5 rail species which included 3_ Black and J_0 Yel low! Two beautiful mal Ring-necked Pheasants were also seen, one just inside the entrance and another just after we left the Refuge. From about noon until 2:30 p.m. we birded the High Island area where we found late Worm-eating and Myrtle Warblers and an elusive bird briefly flimpsed by David Dauphin which he feels could only have been a Black-throated sparrow. Ironically, what may have been the best bird of the day got away before either Dauphin or others in the party could substantiate the sighting, so we reluctantly decided to consider it as an unconfirmed report. (It should be noted "For the Record" that John and Gloria Tveten saw a Black-throated Sparrow at High Island (!) on April 18, 1965, as reported !n THE SPOONBILL, May, 1965 (pp.3 & 15) and Audubon Field Notes, Aug., 196 (p.497).) As we left High Island heading west along the beach toward Bolivar Flats we