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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977 - Image 2. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/61/show/46.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/61/show/46

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977 - Image 2, May 1977, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/61/show/46.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 1, May 1977
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVI, No. 1, May 1977
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9862
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f028_005_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 w "~" PAST EVENTS by Ted Eubanks, Jr. Spring migration on the Texas Gulf Coast Is as unpredictable as the weather systems which affect it so. For example, migrant birding during March proved to be excellent, with lingering cold fronts causing minor fallouts on March 20 and on the weekend of March 26-27. Early April birding, however, was abnormally slow. A strong high pressure ridge along the Gulf Coast and a powerful storm system off the Yucatan combined to produce one of the most migrant-scarce early-Aprils In memory. For Instance, on the weekend of April 8-9 David and Jan Dauphin birded the coast from Galveston to High Island and observed no warblers. On the same weekend In 1976, at the same locations, I recorded 18 species. This, therefore, Is the setting for the April 16 OG field trip to High Island, a day which once again proved the Inconstancies of migrant birding, a day which went from scarcity to abundance, from famine to feast. The morning of April 16 dawned dust-dry, the rains which had deluged Houston the day before having totally missed High Island. The 30-odd participants on the field trip met at 8:00 a.m. In High Island's roadside park, and divided Into two groups to cover the region's habitat more effectively. One group, under the guidance of Paul Nimmons, birded the oil fields surrounding the salt dome, and recorded Black Tern, Long-billed Marsh Wren and Virginia Rail, among other species. The second group, led by David Dauphin, covered Scout's Woods, and were rewarded for their efforts "the grand total of one Hooded Warblerl Down, but not out, Dauphin regrouped the troops at Smith's Woods and began the battle anew. Gradually, as the morning wore on, the tide began to change. Numerous bands of warblers began to appear in the pecan trees on the north side of Smith's, and before the rains came at noon more than twenty species had been recorded. Although the torrents washed most of the birders away at noon, many of the die-hards stayed In hopes that the rains would produce one of the famous Gulf Coast passarlne fallouts In the afternoon. (And It did. See below. —Ed.) MIGRANT FALLOUT AT HIGH ISLAND by JIm Morgan On April 16 a mid-day thunderstorm followed by light Intermittent rain produced a significant migrant fallout at High Island. After a dull morning the welcome rain brough down large numbers of birds all afternoon. Sightings of various birders observing this event showed a count of 25 species of warblers. Our party of Glenn and Penny Cureton and myself logged 20 species of warblers plus numerous other migrants. AlI estimates of numbers have been submitted to the Clearing House for publication. A brief list of the highlights Includes 50+ Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, 200+ Red-eyed Vlreos, 200+ Tennessee Warblers, 100+ Orchard Orioles, 175+ Scarlet Tanagers, 75+ Summer Tanagers and 100+ Indigo Buntings. Also significant was the sighting of 20+ Blackpoll Warblers. The total number of Individuals was estimated at 1200+ migrants which Includes only Smith's Woods. Including Boy Scout Woods would probably bring the total to 2000+ as reports from that area said that the fallout was exceptional there also. All estimates are felt to be conservative But such a fallout produced excitement far beyond mere numbers to report. For Instance, the viewing of 5 Scarlet and 2 Summer Tanagers through my binoculars while focused on one spot, or three BlackpolIs In binocular view at one time, or the finding of generally low feeding warblers Csuch as Worm-eating Warblers) high in the trees, or finding the huge Live Oaks. In the middle of Smith's Woods literally covered with Red-eyed Vlreos and Tennessee Warblers which one had to sort through to find other species, or finding a Mulberry tree sprinkled with the variety of color produced by numerous Tanagers, Rose-breated Grosbeaks, Indigo Buntings and Orchard Orioles, only to be enhanced when a male Northern Oriole zips In to get In on the feast. Such a fallout is a truly rewarding experience to view. In order to follow up on this fallout, Ted Eubanks, Jr. and I returned to High Island the next morning where we found the total number of Individuals to be much less than the preceding afternoon, but the variety of species even better. We ran Into Paul and Margaret Jones who had seen 19 species of warblers by 8:00 a.m. Cand 24 by 10:00 —Ed.)! Ted and I logged 24 species of warblers that day plus all the migrant thrushes In good numbers, both cuckoos In quantities and large numbers of catbirds. This was truly a weekend that I (and others I am sure) will remember for a long time. COMMENTARY ON THIS SPRING'S MIGRATION ■'!' «J The south-easterly winds seemed to push our warblers right on over our heads, except when the occasional rains brought some down. But they didn't seem to tarry long, a few hours and they were up, up and away. The May Dallas newsletter reports a scarcity of warblers; Tom Collins, who has monitored Freeport Municipal Park several times a day for the past month and a half, reports that when numbers of warblers come In to the park after a rain, they seem to melt away within a few short hours. 1975-1976 found the weather favoring the birders, this year it favored the birds! But the