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The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 9, January 1970
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 9, January 1970 - Image 1. January 1970. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/600/show/592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1970). The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 9, January 1970 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/600/show/592

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 9, January 1970 - Image 1, January 1970, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/600/show/592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 9, January 1970
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIII, No. 9, January 1970
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1970
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9855
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f007_001_001.jpg
Transcript J Volume XVIII, No. 9 January, 1970 "He clasps the crag with hooked hands: Close to the sun, in lonely lands, Ringed with the azure world he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls." Lines on eagles by Tennyson PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP, OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB, HOUSTOH, TEXAS W00DHAM RANCH FIELD TRIP - by Louise Rogers, Sunday, December 14, 1969 Hot coffee and freshly baked cookies, compliments of Mr, and Mrs. J. D. Woodham, welcomed the 16 birders who showed up between 7800 and 7:30 AM at the Woodham's ranch near Dickinson, The earliest arrivals, the birder-photographers, set up shop in the blind located a few hundred feet from the house while the rest of the group roughed it on the Woodham's enclosed back porch, complete with front row seats lined up at the picture window, A dozen bobwhites were already feeding in the field a couple of hundred yards from the house and somewhat closer to the blind when the prairie chickens began flying in at 7:50, The chickens joined the quail briefly and then began to move toward the house. During the next 50 minutes approximately 12, mostly females, took up positions in front of the picture window, wandering through the yard, flying up into the trees, perching on stumps and fence posts* A couple of older males displayed and out stomped a few younger ones„,but .there was no coamings. The chickens flewoff as they had flown in, a few at a time, until by 8;40 all had departed. The birders in the blind, having been pretty well bypassed by the prairie chickens, rejoined the rest of the group on the porch who had enjoyed first-rate viewing of the birds. After some more cookies, coffee and conversation with the hospitable Woodhams, several birders headed back for Houston and Christmas festivities while the rest went on to the Texas City and the water on both sides of th§ dike along its entire length was studied carefully. The weather was fine with no wind and intermittent clouds. A total of 33 species was arrived at following lunch on the dike, but THE GULL was not sighted. Most interesting of the birds along the dike were, of course, the white pelicans plus an estimated 75 eared grebes so thightly bunched on the water that they resembled a school of fish. No one recalled having such a formation of grebes before. Oddly, only one duck was sighted, a lesser scaup. Following lunch jand ths countdown, the birders went their separate ways. In addition to Mr. and Mrs, Woodham, the day's list of birders included Wallace C„ Mebane, Jr., Louise Rogers, David Marrack and Ma_y Marrack, Mr, and Mrs. Harry L. Brister, Loyd Nelson and Violet Nelson, Tommy Barnes, Florence Barnes, and James Barnes, Marilyn Crane, F. T. Saadeh, and Alfred Schultz. THE "600" CLUB" by Bessie G. Cornelius I have never seen anything written about the "600 Club" in the Spoonbill. Perhaps this would be interesting and informative to.the new birders. Of the several million birdwatchers in the United States, a relative few have achieved life lists of 600 or more North American species seen north of the Mexican border. Please note I have said North American species and north of the border. Many people have impressive lists of birds seen from all over the world. The area we are speaking of includes Lower California, the original 48 states, Alaska, Canada, Bermuda and Greenland, being th§ regions considered by top ornithologists of the country to be North America from an avifaunal viewpoint. The North American species are those appearing on the American Ornithological Union 1957 Checklist, Those who have achieved the 600 birds or more listed by A.O.U, may qualify for the mythical "600 Club", Ho dues, no meetings!,