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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 12, April 1965
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 12, April 1965 - Image 3. April 1965. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5931/show/5925.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1965). The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 12, April 1965 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5931/show/5925

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 12, April 1965 - Image 3, April 1965, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5931/show/5925.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 12, April 1965
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XIII, No. 12, April 1965
Contributor (Local)
  • Wright, Bill
  • Wright, Betty
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1965
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 27
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9850
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f027_004_003.jpg
Transcript numbers these days. "We are currently gearing ourselves to establishing a continuing laboratory service to help with well-documented cases, but, meanwhile, all I can do is to suggest freezing specimens after wrapping them carefully in saran wrap, which will help prevent dehydration, and then looking around for a laboratory which is willing to analyse them at a reasonable cost. It is particularly important to have a full history of what happened in connection with these deaths, since, otherwise, they will mean little. "Experimental work has recently demonstrated that birds can die from high levels of chemical pesticides in their systems when they become exposed to stress conditions that cause them to lose weight. Migration and starvation are such stresses, and this is why birds which have been poisoned in the north may not die until they reach you. Sincerely, Roland C. Clement FROM THE PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT (with comment) "Mission, April... The birds and the bird watchers are packing Bentsen- Rio Grande State Park this winter as they never have before and Luhe McConnell, park manager, chirps like a hungry sparrow in telling all about it. Of course, McConnell, who has been cited by the National Audubon Society, is the crusading type and as the host at the internationally famed flyway rendezvous boasts that visitors arriving without knowing a scissor-tailed flycatcher from a buzzard generally depart as confirmed birders. The twittering at the 587-acre, river-front park began early this year and has lasted late. The birds were there in great numbers, with a few newcomers, and the camping visitors have kept close to the 100 per day since December. Birds and bird watchers vie for distances traveled. McConnell said 98 per cent of the patrons are from out of state. As for the birds, most of them stop by during migration. But there are some standbys such as the headline attraction--the famed green jay with its solid black head and predominantly green body and tail, and the Lichtenstein oriole, with its distinctive bright yellow wing patch. The park manager said a conspicuous visitor this year has been the rose- throated beeard, a lively songster about the size of a blue bird (sic). He said he had recently seen two females. Observations of other strange birds also have been reported to him. Rare specimens at the park include Audubon's oriole, hooded oriole, zone- tailed hawk, Merill's (sic) pauraque, groove-billed ani, Sennett's thrasher, and red-eyed cowbird." Those of you who are fans of Hubert Mewhinney, the resident classicist, grammarian, natural historian, archaeologist, flint chipper and conservationist of The Houston Post, know that he is conducting a contest between the leading national liberal and conservative political journals to see which can make the bigger boo-boo in grammar and in historical fact. Well, 1 would like to challenge the appropriate department of any state government to a similar contest with our Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and I would like to enter the above article as the first and probably last entry. I believe that we can win hands down with this one blow. The head of the green jay is not solid black. The whole crown and nape are quite blue with a large blue face patch. Some people may not think that the green jay's generic name, Cyanocorax (Gr. kyanos, blue + Lat. corax, raven or crow) is quite appropriate, but that is what it is, nonetheless. The majority of the names used in the last paragraph have been obsolete since 1957 when the fifth edition of The A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds was published. And, in the process of using a sub-specific vernacular name, i.e. Merrill's pauraque,(a practice presently discouraged by ornithologists) Merrill was misspelled.