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The Spoonbill, Vol. 31, No. 2, June 1982
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 31, No. 2, June 1982 - Image 1. June 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5922/show/5908.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1982). The Spoonbill, Vol. 31, No. 2, June 1982 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5922/show/5908

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 31, No. 2, June 1982 - Image 1, June 1982, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5922/show/5908.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 31, No. 2, June 1982
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXI, No. 2, June 1982
Contributor (Local)
  • Pinkston, Randy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1982
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9867
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f013_006_001.jpg
Transcript Volume XXXI, No. 2 June, 1982 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP OF THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB HOUSTON. TEXAS Randy Pinkston. Editor IT RAINED. THE WARBLERS CAME. AND THE "MAGGIES" HAD THEIR DAY! by Jim Morgan oast on May 7, 1982 had the good igrant fallouts of recent years, from even the more veteran obser- fallout in two years and the best in a decade"...T. Ben Feltner; on Island"...Ted Eubanks, Jr.; Corpus Christi during the 1980 Having personally witnessed most six years I can safely say that t since May 13, 1976. Highlights Observers who arrived early on the c fortune to witness one of the best m This magnificent event brought raves vers of UTC fallouts; "Best warbler number of.Magnolia Warblers I've had "Best I've ever seen on West Galvest "Reminded me of the great fallout at TOS Spring Meeting"...Tony Gallucci. of the May fallouts during the past this fallout was the best May fallou of this day will be given below. A strong cold front brought widespread rain over much of southeast Texas all day and night on May 6, but, at first, most of the rain was inland. Galveston'began getting rain at 6:00 p.m., lasting at least to 10)30 p.m. Farther east to High Island and Sabine, and out over the Gulf, the rain and thunderstorms persisted well into the night. The wind had shifted by late evening on the 6th and blew from the NW at 15 knots during the night and all the following day. On the night of the 7th an overnight record low temperature (47 F) was set in Houston, giving further evidence to the strength Of the front. Rainfall totals with this weather system varied between 1| and 6 inches on the UTC. I was up early on May 7 and set a quick course to High Island. I was approaching Winnie at daybreak and there was good light as I headed south on Hwy. 124 towards the coast. Just a few miles out of Winnie I had my first good observation of the day - a flooded rice field with 600 Hudsonian Godwits feeding in it! Continuing on it was immediately obvious it was going to be a good day. Hundreds upon hundreds of small, warbler-size passerines were flying next to the road and heading north in flocks of 20 to 50 at a time. At times, some would break flight and dive into the hedgerows while the others continued on. Out oyer the coastal prairie and marsh more small birds could be seen heading north. Clearly, a major migratory movement of passerines was taking place. I arrived at High Island at 7:10 a.m. as scores of small passerines were darting through bushes and trees and across the small road in front of me. After parking I did not move more than 50 ft. in the first 20-30 minutes. Birds were everywhere, and it was immediately obvious that Magnolia Warbler and American Redstart were the dominant species of this fallout. Thus, I made a concerted effort to actually count both of these species during the day. It took over 4 hours to thoroughly work High Island and by 11:30.a.m. it was obvious that about 2/3 of the birds had already left the woods, presumeably heading further north. I suspect that many of the birds I saw coming down Hwy. 124.had come in during the night and already were leaving the coastal migrant traps. In 4 hours I had seen 21 species of warblers and counted, to the best of my ability, over 1,700 individuals! Among these were 795 Magnolia Warblers and 450 American Redstarts. In the afternoon I continued down Bolivar peninsula and found birds at all my stops, but it was evident here too that the density of indivi-