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The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991
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The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991 - Image 3. October 1991. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5879/show/5873.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1991). The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5879/show/5873

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991 - Image 3, October 1991, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5879/show/5873.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXX, No. 10, October 1991
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1991
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9876
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
Note Incorrect volume number, XXXX, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f009_010_003.jpg
Transcript Black-Throated Blue Warbler! The bird compounded the felony by making three (!) command appearances in the bushes to the right of Purkey's pond giving everybody a good view. The trip ended with about 50 birders--we picked up a few stragglers—enjoying a micro-fallout in the trees behind the pond. Several species of warblers, a Yellow-throated Vireo and a female Scarlet Tanager were seen. Thanks to all the birders who helped us do our part in making the beaches of Texas a little cleaner. See you next yearl 1991 SMITH POINT HAWK COUNT Gail Diane Luckner and Frank Peace At noon on Thursday, October 10, we tallied the final raptor of the 1991 Smith Point Hawk Count. Fine weather aided our effort as we recorded nearly 11,000 Broad-winged Hawks and 1,550 accipiters in over eighty hours of observation during the three-week count period. Highlights included four low- flying Peregrine Falcons, 24 Merlins and two immature American Swallow-tailed Kites. Two Crested Caracaras wandering welt east of their normal range also made an appearance. In all, over 13,600 hawks were observed for an average of about 170 birds per hour. Complete hawk count results will be available next month. Many thanks to our count leaders and to everyone who came out to Abshier Wildlife Management Area to enjoy the hawks with us. \>\ LETTER TO THE OG FROM SCOTT L. TRIEBES PARK SUPERINTENDENT I. SAN JACINTO BATTLEGROUND STATE PARK Dear Birders, I would like to take this opportunity to tell you how much I have enjoyed receiving and reading The Spoonbill over the years. It is amazing the abundance of birds in and around the Houston area. In reading The Spoonbill I am concerned that there has been no entry under "List of Locations" for the San Jacinto Battleground, for quite some time. I do not know whether the Battleground is too far to travel for some birders or possibly the number of species of birds have diminished. For whatever reason, the Battleground offers birders a pleasant surrounding for viewing, in close proximity to the Houston area. According to Christmas counts held from 1976 to 1979, there are were over 150 species counted. There are probably more during spring and fall migration. In your September 1991 issue, you mention "being lucky" to see a Wood Stork. Being somewhat of a novice birder myself, I have see several wood Storks in and around the Battlegrounds, especially during this time of year. I would eventually like to have a checklist for the park and was wondering if you would like to help. ...I would encourage your organization to come out and visit the San Jacinto Battlegrounds. Park hours are from 8:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. April 1 to October 31 and 8:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M. November 1 to March 31. If you have any questions or if I can be of any assistance, please call me or Park Manager, James E. Frantz, at 713/479-2431. GALVESTON ISLAND STATE PARK CHECKLIST OF BIRDS compiled by Ted L. Eubanks, Jr. [Below is the introduction to the checklist reprinted with the permission of the author. Ed.) Once little more than a wavering sliver of grass- carpeted sand, Galveston Island now favors the Inland cities massed along the shores of the bay that carries its name. The inhospitable nature of a windswept barrier island has been supplanted by a blight of more "accommodating" (to humans, at least) beach homes, condominiums and curio shops. Only at Galveston Island State Park has a vestige of the original island coastal prairie been restored and preserved. This 2000-acre park, situated six miles southwest of the western tip of Galveston's seawall, offers visitors a rare, intimate view of a barrier island ecosystem. Biological communities that once so typified this northernmost barrier island on the Texas coast still flourish at this vestigial spot as though the footsteps of Cabeza de Vaca and Jean Lafitte were only imagined imprints in the beach sand. Spanning the width of the island from the Gulf Of Mexico across to West Galveston Bay, the park is comprised of a mosaic of coastal habitats which hosts a surprising variety of birds. The secret to finding any specific bird is to search the right habitat at the right time of year. This checklist has been compiled in hopes that visitors to the park will have adequate information to locate the species that are the objects of their quest. To that end, pay specific attention to the habitat codes that accompany each species on the checklist. These classifications are based upon the general habitat types utilized by the birds in the park, and are not necessarily reflective of vegetational communities. The habitats that are of interest to birders are as follows: Open waters of the Gulf of Mexico Extending from the beach gulfward to the horizon, the stretch of the Gulf of Mexico that is visible from the park is noteworthy for the seabirds that periodically pass over and through is waters. In addition to the ubiquitous pelicans, gulls and terns that congregate over the Gulf, birders may also see Northern Gannets in the winter, Pomarine arid Parasitic jaegers in the winter and during migrations and Magnificent Frigatebirds in summer and fall. There are winters when sea ducks gather offshore, presenting the rare opportunity to see Oldsquaw, and Black, Surf and white-winged scoters in Texas. In early spring, migrating Tricolored Herons, White Ibis, Fulvous Whistling-Ducks and Blue-winged Teal can be seen returning from their southerly wintering grounds in an endless stream of birds moving laterally along the coast. Sandy beach/dune This littoral habitat ranges from the water tine landward through the fore-is land dunes. The vegetation on the gulfward dune faces is dominated succulents and salt- tolerant species such as sea-purslane (Sesuvium portulacastrum). fiddle leaf morning glory (Ipomaea stolonifera). bitter or seaside panicum (Panicum aroarum) and camphor daisy (Heterotheca subaxillaris). This community grades into a seacoast bluestem (Schizachvrium scoparium) - gulfdune paspalum (Paspalun monostachvum) comaunity on the landward dune slopes. Gulls and terns roost in mixed flocks along the open beaches, and unusual species such as Franklin's Gull, Glaucous Gull and Common Tern are usually associated with these groups. Several species of shorebirds, including the endangered Piping Plover, can be seen feeding in the wet sand along the water line. Horned Larks (year-round) and several species of sparrows (winter) can be found foraging for seeds in the heavy grasses immediately behind the dunes. In the winter and during