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The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991
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The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991 - Image 2. October 1991. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5879/show/5872.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1991). The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5879/show/5872

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991 - Image 2, October 1991, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5879/show/5872.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 10, October 1991
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXX, No. 10, October 1991
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1991
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9876
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
Note Incorrect volume number, XXXX, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f009_010_002.jpg
Transcript Libby Price challenged OG members to generate creative spending ideas for the $188.00+ in the aluminum can fund. Frank Peace reported a smaller number of hawks were sighted in the Hawkwatch this'year, with a total of 12,634 observed since September 20. the highest count in the state was from Corpus Christi which as the advantage of visual observation and radar. Frank expressed his gratitude to participants and praised Gail Luckner for her invaluable assistance. The chairman's request for notable bird sightings resulted in the report of Couch's Kingbird seen at Brazos Bend State Park, a Black Swan at the Attwater refuge and a Chuck-will's-widow, two Painted Buntings and a Palm Warbler at High Island. Flocks of Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were noted and Brazoria National Wildlife Refuge was reported have ducks and geese. Gail Luckner introduced the evening's speaker, naturalist Gene Blacklock. Gene explored the mystery of migration, sharing his experiences, knowledge and new research. He discussed f lyways and the role geography plays in migration routes. Gene piqued the group's interest when he revealed research on some passerines had resulted in the discovery of a bacteria in their necks. This bacteria aligns itself north and south which causes the bird to feel discomfort unless it too is in alignment with the bacteria. Gene was an intense and lively guest speaker. Christine Bourgeois, Secretary EIGHT THREE-DAY TRIPS TO THE DRY TORTUGAS FROM KEY WEST, FLORIDA on a large, fast V-hulled boat have been planned by Wings, Inc. from the middle of April through the first week in May, 1992. Two leaders will accompany each group. Itinerary includes search for deep water pelagics, two mornings at Fort Jefferson, visits to Loggerhead and Middle Keys, and return to Key West via Rebecca and Cosgrove shoal towers. See Sooty Terns and Brown Noddies by the thousands, hundreds of Magnificent Frigatebirds and Masked and Brown Boobies with Audubon's Shearwater and Bridled Tern likely. White-tailed Tropicbird and Black Noddy are possible. For more information, contact Wings, Inc., P.O. Box 31930, Tucson, AZ 85751. NOEL'S NICHE LOOKING BACK Bv Hoel Pettingell 10 YEARS AGO/FROM OCTOBER 1981 SPOONBILL IMPORTANT: A GIFT WE CAN ALL SHARE High Island is one of the finest migrant traps on the whole Texas coast and hence the nation. Over the past several years we birders have been singularly fortunate in being permitted access to the richest birding areas of that unique community. Smith Woods and Boy Scout Woods (Lamar Woods) have been traditionally held open to us through acts of kinoness, but guaranteed access has never been forthcoming until now. Through the dedicated hard work of three young men, Fred Collins, Ted Eubanks and Pete Peltier, the Houston Audubon Society (HAS) has negotiated the purchase of the Louis Smith property, the fenced land immediately adjacent to and biologically part of Boy Scout Uoods. This is of course a marvelous opportunity for us to insure that we and future generations will have a migrant trap to visit. It is my understanding that the Smith Purchase will also act as a core from which it is hoped that the HAS will add future acquisitions. To those of you who have birded this area there is no need to stress its value; it is unique. Annually High Island is the target of thousands of tired migrants and hundreds of enthusiastic birders. Thanks to the Houston Audubon Society, it is now a permanent sanctuary and birders haven. T. Ben Feltner ARTICLES JUST IN CASE YOU HAVEN'T HEARD: THE HOUSTON AUDUBON SOCIETY HAS SUCCEEDED IN SECURING A LEASE ON BOLIVAR FLATS! Houston Audubon Society (HAS) will lease 550 acres for $5 per year. Under the five-year lease, HAS may build fences around the area but cannot restrict access to the open beach. Ted Eubanks, who worked for this lease arrangement along with Houston Audubon Vice President of Sanctuaries, Gretchen Mueller, said, "This partnership between Houston Audubon and the Texas General Land Office will work to enhance Bolivar Flats' value to wildlife and the public. This preserve, the first shorebird preserve on the Texas Gulf coast, is unique from a research standpoint, other shorebird preserves may have many more shorebirds as far as numbers go, but no other has more variety--or greater number of different species in such a small area than Bolivar Flats, we have Land Commission Garry Mauro to thank for this unprecedented action." You are urged to write to Garry Mauro and let him know how you feel about the lease of Bolivar Flats to Houston Audubon. Garry Mauro, 1700 North Congress Avenue, Austin, Texas 78701. NOVEMBER 23 IS WHOOPING CRANE DAY AT MATAGORDA ISLAND STATE PARK. Robin Doughty, geography professor at The University of Texss and author of Return o__ the Whooping Crane, will lead a birdwatching tour from 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.H. on Matagorda Island. Tour fees include ferry and bus or truck trensporation and adult fees include the Texas Conservation Passport. Cost is $39 for adults (or $14 if you already have a TCP). For more information and the required reservations, please call Matagorda Island State Park at 512/983-2215. Texas Parks and Uildlife News, October 11. 1991. ' ucroDBr TEXAS COASTAL CLEANUP AND OG FIELD TRIP by Mike Gremillion About 35 06 members hit the beach at Bolivar Flatson September 21 to participate in the Sixth Annual TexasCoastal Cleanup and OG Field Trip. Birding leader Bob Behrstock guided the group through a typical Bolivar Flats smorgasbord of gulls, terns, cormorants, pelicans, plovers and assorted sandpipers. Of special interest were the Reddish Egret "canopy feeding" on the flats and the flock of Blue-Hinged Teal that buzzed the sandbar. The Audubon Society bag-lady broke up the fun promptly at 9:00 A.M. and the birders dispersed from the point of the flats to the entrance road and back into the dunes for 3 hours of the difficult, often disgusting chore of collecting a year's worth of flotsam, jetsam and dumpsam. 06 chairman Bob Honig, leading by example, easily won the "muddy jeans" award. By noon the beach was ringed with hundreds of bags of yuck along with a water heater tank and a nearly intact sofa. It's amazing and sad that so many use this wonderful piece of habitat as a dumping ground. As the group prepared to leave we were rewarded with the soul-stirring sight of a young Peregrine ripping low over the marsh at full throttle chasing a flock of shorebirdsl After a brief lunch at Zeb's (NO shrimp salad) David Bradford led the group through the Oryx oil field. The birding started out a little slow and then kind of tapered off. Not the story at the Audubon woods on High Island. Shortly after arriving David located a beautiful male