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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 4, August 1978
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 4, August 1978 - Image 1. August 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5870/show/5854.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1978). The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 4, August 1978 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5870/show/5854

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 4, August 1978 - Image 1, August 1978, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5870/show/5854.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 4, August 1978
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVII, No. 4, August 1978
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date August 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9863
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f001_008_001.jpg
Transcript p Volume XXVI I, No. 4 August, 1978 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP, OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB COMING EVENTS Saturday OG field trip to Galveston. Meet at Kempner Park at 8:00 a.m. Bring Aug. 26 lunch and insect repellent. This is a half-day trip, however those who wish to continue birding are welcome to follow the leader to Bolivar Flats to see what shorebirds have started returning. Thursday Sept. 7 OG seminar wood. Jim Tucker Meet at 7:50 p.m. at Bayou Manor auditorium, 4141 So. Braes- founder of the American Birding Association and Editor of Rinding magazine, will present a program on songs of birds. He will illustrate his program with tape recordings, pointing out clues to song identification and interpretation. Remember to bring your aluminum for Jerry Baker. Ted Eubanks wishes to remind you photographers to bring good slides or duplicates of your good slides of Checklist birds from Common Loon through Whistling Swan for our Slide Library. This is the beginning phase of updating our library, so your very best efforts are wanted. Avis Brister, Slide Librarian, will be there to receive them. Tuesday ONC meeting. 8:00 p.m. at the Garden Center in Hermann Park. Randell Sept. 7 Beavers of the Spring Branch Science Center will present the program on "Birds of the Upper Texas Coast" Saturday 0G field trip to High Island. Meet at 8:00 a.m. at roadside park in High Sept. 16 Island. Bring lunch and insect repellent. This, too, is a half-day trip, but birding will be continued at Bolivar Flats In the afternoon for those who wish it. On all our field trips, remember to bring a sack for aluminum litter you find; by picking it up we can enhance our treasury and the landscape! OUT OF DOORS IN SOUTHERN NEW MEXI CO—(coneI us 1 on) by Gladys Schumacher Donohue The little dark-eyed junco (or Red-backed or Gray-headed, depending upon when you started birding) seems to be present, in all life zones from the juniper-pinyon btome upwards. Perhaps, since it was only early May, they were simply wintering in the upper Sonoran zone, but I did not think so. I fed them chicken scratch at all my camps, and all were very tame, coming to within a foot of me if I sat still. The Say's pboebe I found at only two places. The one in James Canyon was in the pinyon-junlper belt. A pair It was, and I saw her bring a long piece of grass to the Adirondack shelter above a picnic table there. A few days later she was sitting on eggs in a neat little nest just under the roof peak over the picnic table, which was at the side of the shelter. Why she did not choose to nest on the opposite side of the shelter I could not fathom, because it was a well-used table, and whenever picnickers came she would be very disturbed and fly off until they left. I wondered if the eggs would ever hatch. The other pair built a nest over the bathroom door at the Three-Rivers Petroglyphs area. And a precarious nest It was, the beam on which It sat being about I 1/2 inches in width. The nest was fitted onto this beam so that it was an oblong nest. I did not see the bird use it. But both were around, calling their plaintive calls. A lonesome sound, but if you are the only camper around, as sometimes happens, it becomes a welcome one. The petroglyphs were chiseled into the rocks on a knoll overlooking the white sands in the high desert country by primitive peoples, for what purpose is not known. The drawings represent birds, frogs, turtles, sun signs, snakes, rain, animals, and even a few men. My personal opinion is that they were done as a form of doodling by lookouts for the village belowl The spot is exceptionally lovely, backed by foothills of juniper and looking out over a wide panorama of greasewood, or creosote- bush (LaAAea. tiudentata), 4-wing saltbush ikOUplex cane&ceni), rabbit brush (.Chty- iothamnui nau&eo&uA), and some very scrubby mesquite (PAD&opiA glandulo&a), all of