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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979
Image 15
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979 - Image 15. March 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5688/show/5684.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1979). The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979 - Image 15. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5688/show/5684

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979 - Image 15, March 1979, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5688/show/5684.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVII, No. 11, March 1979
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9864
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f004_003_015.jpg
Transcript Page 13 Merlin: Fast flying falcon, larger than Kestrel; pointed wings, slate gray back; barred.tail. Bird emerged from hedgerow trees and flew swift and low to ground directly Into other trees and disappeared, which is very characteristic of this species. Seen by both observers ■'or 5 seconds in excellent light from 30 to 40 feet. —Jim Morgan StiIt Sandpiper: 4 seen, +wo wi+h heavy barring on breas+. Long non-yellow legs, and long, sllgh+ly decurved bill and Lesser Yellowlegs size also no+ed. Seen near several Lesser Yellowlegs. —Steve & Sandra Calver White-winged Dove: 100+ In trees late In the afternoon at Public Health Hospital in Galveston. The ones in our yard all month were not around at all during January. —Jane HamlI ton BUFF-BELLIED HUMMINGBIRD: Reported by feeder owner to have been present for +wo weeks prior +o slgh+lng on 7+h. Very cold and windy day, bird was observed feeding frequently, each time returning to perch low, about 2' above ground In hedge at side of yard. Large hummer, larger than Rufous and possible Black-chlnned female, also present. Chased Rufous, but would allow female to stay on side of feeder. Large size, green throat and buff belly convinced observers of identification. (An interesting note: both this bird and the Buff-bellied at the Cureton's last winter were observed to perch very low In bushes. Does anyone know if this is a characteristic of Buff-bellies as a rule?) —Margaret Anderson fide MJ Sprague's Pipit: streaked back, pink legs; lone bird with Water Pipits in grassy area. —Ron Braun Oriole, NorthernCBullock's): Bird observed coming to humming feeder five and six 'times a day; only difficulty seen in feeding from this type feeder was in finding a-steady perch, but bird apparently learned how to "hold on" while eating, with only an occasional slip after the few days. Building activity on rear of house kept bird away for several days at the end of February, but he soon returned to his"-usual feeding habits. —Shirley Wright Black-headed Grosbeak: a male Is being seen 3-5 p.m. daily In the yard of a nelgh- bor In Angleton—where he Is being supplied with sunflower seeds. —Mary Reed Lapland Longspur: Rattling call in flight; black tails with white borders, sparrow- sized, walking through stubble; wing bars, striped sides and back, eye stripe and cheek patch somewhat buffy; some with smudge of black on breast; seen at 100 yard:; through 30 power scope for 10 minutes; familiar with bird from northeast coast. —Will Risser SPECIAL REPORT TO THE CLEARING HOUSE Abird I had never seen before is the subject of this report. Observed Feb. 20, 1979 at Boy Scout Woods, High Island between 2:00 and 2:45 p.m. approximately, in sunny weather, using 8x binocs at a distance of 15-40 feet. Total observation time was approximately 90 seconds. There were no"other'observers to my knowledge. The bird was Immediately striking on initial notice as being an alI cinnamon bird. Judging size from nearby Brown Thrashers, I woul put the overall length at about 8". The rather slim bird had no belly streaking or spots, no wing bars, no eye ring. The face about the eye was a bit lighter tint than the rest of the visible head, which was a cinnamon-rufous color; the bill was a medium gray In appearance and rathe vlreo-like, with the suggestion of a slightly decurved tip on one view. The throat was the same cinnamon-rufous color, without noticeable lightening at the throat, this color continuing essentiallyunchanged onto the breast and belly. The undertail coverts were a bright cinnamon-buff, the medium length unnotched tail a darker cinnamon brown, as were the wings. The rump was a brighter cinnamon than the surrounding plumage of the tail, wings and back. The legs appeared dark, as were the eyes. When first seen the bird was perched in the low canopy in rather erect, upright position. After a phoebe-like flicking of the tail twice the bird flew across the woods. When relocated, the bird's posture was noted to be very slightly hump-backed, much less extreme but vaguely reminiscent of the photograph of the Eared Trogon that appeared in American Birds of March 1978. The bird again flew off across the woodlot and could not be relocated. No voice was heard that could be attributed to this bird. I never saw the top of the head. I considered several birds among the possibilities. Say's Phoebe has generally rus+y belly and undertail coverts, but beyond that has little similarity of plumage. Clay-colored thrush is a browner bird, lighter under the chin and has a very different body comportment. I also considered some transition plumage of a tanager but Continued on back page