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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979 - Image 5. March 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5688/show/5674.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1979). The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5688/show/5674

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979 - Image 5, March 1979, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5688/show/5674.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVII, No. 11, March 1979
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9864
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f004_003_005.jpg
Transcript Page 5 This hazard was mentioned In Around and About, January, 1978, In a report of a conversation with Mr. Kilpatrick, manager of Ellington Air base about Prairie Chickens on the base, and the problem with gulls on the runway. Mr. Kilpatrick mentioned at the time that he would drive down the runway, hoping to force the gulls to fly away, but they would simply lift up, fly a short distance in front of the car, then circle back and settle placidly on the runway again! ** From "Bechtel Briefs", a magazine published for the employees of the Bech+el group of companies. Engineers and Constructors, we note that Industry Is trying to protect migratory birds. "Syncrude Canada's environmental staff has erected a mechanical scarecrow on a pond containing unrecoverable bitumen from the nearby Syncrude Tar Sands Project in northeastern Alberta, Canada in an effort to protect migratory birds from bitumen's harmful effects. "Bitumen extracted from tar sands at the Syncrude project, for which Canadian Bechtel was managing contractor, can destroy the Insulating properties of migratory birds' feathers and can poison birds when they preen themselves. To repel the birds from the tailings pond, Syncrude Canada has deployed a team of environmentalists +o clear the pondi's shoreline of vege+a+ion, +o use oil containment and clean-up devices on the pond's surface, and build "Bitumap" scarecrows on the oiled parts of the pond. "Bitu-man" stands almost 2 1/2 meters tall and is mounted on an anchored raft. The figure Is balanced to Imitate human movements when the wind is blowing, while a pair of exaggerated eyes lends additional realism to the human-like effect. A propane nolsemaker makes an explosion like a shotgun at frequent Intervals to frighten birds away as well. Syncrude plans +o s+a+ion a small army of "Bi+u-men" on +he pond +o keep +he birds away from oily areas in the fu+ure." THE LEARNING CORNER Do you rely too strongly on color In your field identifications? Last fall, THE ROADRUNNER, newsletter of the Maricopa Audubon Society (Tempe, Ariz.), had a black and white photograph of a mystery bird on the cover of the August issue. Obviously a female oriole, but which one? Not until the October issue was the bird Identified and clues pointed out that helped make that Identification. Following Is the explanation of this Interesting exercise. "If the photo had been In color, the more obvious Identifying features would have been discernable. However, the black and white photo presented a challenge, causing us to pay closer attention to the more subtle differences. "Without the aid of color, how can one decide whether the female oriole Is a Hooded, a Scott's, a Bullock's or an Orchard Oriole? It Is almost certainly a Hooded Oriole for several reasons—the relatively narrow and decurved bill, the slender body, the fact that the head and back are no+ darker than the underparts, and the contrast between the wings and the upperparts. The bird Is probably not a Scott's Oriole because If it were, the bill would be thicker, the head and back would be darker, and streaking on the back would probably be visible. Bui lock's Oriole Is also an unlikely identification because it too would be darker on the head and back, the bill would be shorter, and the whitish belly would probably be visible. The bill of the bird In the photo Is much too long to be that of an Orchard Oriole. Most of us could Improve our powers of Iden+lfica+lon if we were +o keep the above poln+s In mind while observing female orioles In the field." We on +he upper Texas coast can only sigh with, a twinge of envy at the problem faced by readers of THE ROADRUNNER, for of the four Orioles mentioned, we have only the Orchard and an occasional Bullock's, which Is now lumped with our usual Baltimore as the Northern Oriole. But the point raised is one we could all ponder with benefit. ...color isn't the only means of identification! [Ed. note: From our trusty "Words For Birds", we learn that Oriole Is derived from the French oAiol, which was derived from the Medieval Latin oAiolui, "golden bird", from Latin auAeolui, the diminutive of auAeuA, "golden," and alludes to the yellow of these birds. Ict&Aidae is the conventional form of the Greek ikteAoi meaning "Jaundice", hence yellowish. Myth has it that the sight of an oriole will cure Jaundice. Thus color played a large part In naming these birds, both their common and scientific names, oriole and IcteAuA. The scientific name consists of two elements, the first of which is the generic term, in this Instance, IcteAuA, and the trivial. Thus the Orchard Oriole Is XctXAUA ipuAiui, the trivial portion coming from Latin for "spurious" or "Illegitimate," which is related +o +he Greek ipona, "seed". The species was once known as the Bas+ard Baltimore Oriole. The scientific names of birds are always fascinating to research in "Words For Birds"!