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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979 - Image 2. March 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5688/show/5671.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1979). The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5688/show/5671

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979 - Image 2, March 1979, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5688/show/5671.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 27, No. 11, March 1979
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVII, No. 11, March 1979
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9864
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f004_003_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 PAST EVENTS - OG Field trip to Palmetto S+a+e Park & Seguln, by Jim Morgan On Sa+urday, February 10, 13 OG'ers met a+ Palme+to S+a+e Park on what had to be one of the best days of wea+her In the young 1979. We Immediately headed for the area north of Seguln where Fred Collins observed Mountain Plovers In February, 1978, and where I had found Chestnut-collared and McCown's Longspurs +wo weeks previous. We first searched In vain the field where Fred had found the plovers last year. Moving on down the road we continued to search other plowed fields, when, EUREKA! Ted Eubanks, Jr. called out "I've got a plover!" Training all glasses and scopes on the area, we alI saw at least 7 Mountain Plovers, both at rest and once In a short flight All key field marks were noted as we had multiple angle views and excellent light. Further searching the area for longspurs turned up two early Purple Martins, a Red- shafted Flicker, a Go I den-fronted Woodpecker and a singing Western Meadowlark. Finally, when we were just about to give up, I spotted a swirling flock of birds across another plowed field....Longspurs! We were able to approach within good viewing range of the birds and they turned out to be the expected McCown's Longspurs. Returning to Palmetto In the early afternoon we casually birded this ecologically unique park. In addition to the common woodland species, a Caracara was spotted flying over the San Marcos river. For the day, 65 species were tallied and all agreed that It was a most successful venture. P.S. Fred Collins points out that the Mountain Plovers tend to be found In the same fields year after year. For those who may try next year, follow Fred's directions In the March 1978 SPOONBILL. If not successful, continue east on Hwy 758 a mile or two and look for the road called 140 Schwarzlose. We found the plovers west of this road on the north side of 758. [Ed. note: Though the Mountain Plovers may be gone by the time this SPOONBILL gets to you, here are those directions for those of you who may want to gamble they will stay a little late this year. "At Seguln, turn north on Hhy 46, drive 8 miles to FM 758, then 1.4 miles east on FM 758 to the first paved road, which Is called Dauer 129". The birds were found at this spot for several years. Including the 1977 Christmas Count. Alma Barrera, of Austin, saw a number of these birds, February 24, 1979, on Pleper Road, which she says is one road south of FM 758 off Hwy 46. A word of caution: do your homework on this bird....American Golden Plovers start coming through about now, most still In winter plumage; don't let expectations of seeing one species lead you to a "shoot-from-the-hip" mis-lden+lfIca+Ion of a like species.j A NOTE ON OUR BAPTIST BURROWING OWL by D. Randall Pinks+on (subscriber from Arizona) (Randy sent a slide of +hls dellgh+ful visi+or +o our OG Slide Library). Excitement over +he HBU "jogger-wa+cher" has probably produced mul+I+udes of pho+ographs. If so, +hen please forgive me for adding s+ill another. This one was taken on 7 January 1979. I tried to photograph the bird from the ventral side, but, just like a grasshopper, it would always orient it's back toward me (probably to be at best vantage for escape). Birding in the mountains, since my return to Flagstaff, leaves much to be desired after participating in UTC Christmas Counts. Our lakes are now blanketed heavily with snow so that waterfowl and shorebirds are nowhere to be found. This also leads to dispersion of bald eagles onto open-water lakes and rivers at lower altitudes. Such a situation Is quite in contrast to the late summer and fall birding when surprising appearances of waterfowl and shorebirds were quite frequent. Adult and Immature bald eagles were seen In good numbers on any trip to the lakes at that time. Winter walks through the forests seldom turn up more than ten species, most of which are our typical residents (e.g. hairy woodpecker, common raven, Steller's and plnyon jays, mountain chickadee, white-breasted and pygmy nut-hatches, gray-headed and dark- eyed juncos). One interesting note, however, I found feeding flocks of bushtlts on two consecutive days on the Northern Arizona University campus at 7000 feet elevation. This Is an unusually high altitude for this species to be found in the winter, especially when the recent Inclement weather conditions and heavy snows are considered. [Ed. note: If any subscriber wishes to send some of his/her good slides, or duplicates thereof, to our Slide Library, we wi11 all be very grateful. Send them to Avis Brister, 0G Resource Chairman, 2314 Saxon, Houston, Texas 77018, Some of you may have slides of a species with which you are very familiar In your area, but which Is an unusual, or even rare visitor to the UTC; having a slide of such a bird could be very helpful the next time controversy erupts over Identification of a wanderer. It took Alan Wormlngton's print of an Iceland Gull to settle a few last, lingering doubts about the Freeport "white" gull being the albinistic Herring gull It was!]