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The Spoonbill, Vol. 15, No. 6, October 1966
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 15, No. 6, October 1966 - Image 3. October 1966. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5433/show/5429.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1966). The Spoonbill, Vol. 15, No. 6, October 1966 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5433/show/5429

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 15, No. 6, October 1966 - Image 3, October 1966, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5433/show/5429.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 15, No. 6, October 1966
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XV, No. 6, October 1966
Contributor (Local)
  • Wright, Bill
  • Wright, Betty
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1966
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 30
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9851
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Note Handwritten notes in margins.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f030_010_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3 sparrows that sang all around us. Then a big : Crossbill, and we had another lifer. Iskin turned out to be an immature Red Acadia National Park proved to be a beautiful spot —- one to which we hope to return soon. Our souvenir here was our first Goshawk, sitting on a post and looking quite dapper. We also -stumbled and slopped, through a sphagnum bog — without finding any new birds, but the flower— I lag Pitcher Plants were worth the effort. We even discovered an advantage for going so late in the year — no mosquitoes. After crossing into New Brunswick we stopped just at dusk at a little drive-in for a quick bite. As we waited a floek of birds descended to the parking lot around us, and Gloria had her first Evening Grosbeaks. Such a pretty bird and found at just the proper time of day! This also confirmed my belief in eating, as this was the only place we saw this species. Fundy National Park was our home for the next jouple days. We loved it here — from the dense pine forests to the pretty covered bridges. At supper a group of Canada Jays sat on our table to gather crumbs. The first one arrived so abruptly at Mike's elbow that he spilled his glass of milk. At breakfast a Boreal Chickadee came to visit —< two more lifers for Gloria and two more points for eating! We had to pass up the Blue Nose Ferry from Bar Harbor because of the railroad strike (they operate the ferries also), but we did manage to get to Prince Edward Island. I didn't imagine that such beautiful farm land existed so far north. With a climate moderated by the water they raise vegetables for shipment all over the country. The rolling hills dotted with groves of trees and crystal lakes were very pleasant, and here too we got a lifer — an Arctic Tern sitting on the beach right beside the car so we would be sure not to miss his red bill. Our next stop was Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. I don't know which was more exciting, the birds we saw there or the night drive over the mountains in driving rain and heavy fog to keep our date with Capt. Richard Ahle at Big Bras d'Or. The Allies have a'very pleasant guest house and a boat trip to the bird islands. In the morning the storm had vanished, and outside our window four Pine Grosbeaks sat on a wire to greet the day. It always amuses rae to get a lifer so easily and then hike through miles of woods without findiag it again. It was now September and we were told that most of the Alcids had left their nesting islands; however, full of optimism, we took the boat and our luck held. The Auks and Murres had indeed departed (something left for another day), but several oversized bumble bees bussed the boat at close range and plopped into the water. Those ridiculous bills eould enly belong te Puffins, and I -as almost surprised to find they really do look like their pictures. The recks were covered with European Cormorants who soberly watched us watching them. I wonder how many lifers they got. Leaving Cape Breton after touring the National Park with its fabulous scenery, we headed for the Gaspe" Peninsula in Quebec. On the way we were treated to some Suffed Grouse along the road and a White-winged Scoter (the one we were missing) in a little bay. Our major objective was Bonaventure Island — home of the Gannets. Here was a sure lifer, and they don't make many of those, but the experience was much more thrilling than we had expected. Oa the beat trip out we passed a more unexpected bird— the Black-legged Kittiwake —- and then we began to see Gannets flying overhead. But the real delight came when we rounded the island and saw the cliffs covered with thousands of the huge white birds. Some of the young were still in fluffy white down — . rather ridiculous looking on a bird the size of a goose — but most were now in the immature dark plumage. / Laden with camera equipment I got off the boat on the other side of the island and hiked up over to the top of the cliffs. 1 figured a 10 power lens should get me close enough to the birds to get some nice pictures. This leans was quickly abandoned in favor of the normal one when I had literally waded into the middle of a Gannet colony. My only problem was protecting my legs from those very large beaks! I abandoned the birds when I ran out of film. The walk back to the landing was brightened by a pretty trilling song and I soon spotted three White-winged Crossbills ait- ting on the tips of some little spruced — the last lifer of the trip. Time was running short, and after leaving the Gaspe ws hurried across southern Canada to visit our relatives in Minnesota for a short time. During this part of the trip the rains came and the birds left. We did, however, manage to add the Ring-necked Pheasant, Yellow-headed Blackbird, and Western Meadowlark to our year list. Our trip list amounted to about 140 speoies. I guess we are not as eonsciencious as Noel Pettingell or Jerry and Nancy Stricklin; because we really didn't keep an accurate count. We were out for new birds and new places, and I confess to passing up flocks of shorebirds and numerous dieky-birds because they would not yiell lifers or pictures. Our prizes were 14 lifers for me and 25 for Gloria (unfortunately Mike couldn't count all of his and won't remember them anyway, so I guess we will have to go back), a lot of pictures, and best of all a very nice time.