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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
Image 18
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 18. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5079.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 18. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5079

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 18, February 1978, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5079.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVI, No. 10, February 1978
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9863
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 18
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f001_002_018.jpg
Transcript Page 18 mately 10 minu+es wi+h scope and binocs a+ about 30 yards, then much closer. Martha Micks and I went back the next day and the same bird was there at the same spot. — Jane HamII ton Northern (Baltimore) Oriole: Uniformly orange body with dark wings showing wing bars, the upper bar with an orange cast. Very li+tle dark on hood, mostly around the face. Call notes also heard and distinctly oriole like. Seen by alI 3 observers with binocs for 5 minutes. Excellent light. —Jim Morgan Summer Tanager: Male bird, rose red In color. Seen in flight, moving high in trees. Bird was about 8 inches in length with tail relatively short compared to body (which contrasts with Cardinal's longer tall). Flight was direct, swift and free of undulations or jerks as are common in a Cardinal's flight. Bird alighted in a tree and could not be located thereafter. However, size, color, tall length and flight pattern all add up to the male Summer Tanager rather than the male Cardinal. Seen by two observers for 5 seconds. —Jim Morgan Black-headed Grosbeak: Large finch wl+h conical beak. Head s+riped wi+h brown and whi+e. Breast so rusty that I first mistook it for a robin. Some white in wings. Seen at 15 feet with binocs in leafless tree. One was seen in same place on 1975 Christmas Count. —Glenn Cureton Lapland Longspur: I observed two flocks of Lapland Longspurs In West Harris County on January 15 that differed from the other flocks of Laplands I had been seeing only In that I was able to rea11y see them. One flock was located on Gertie Rice Road, the other on Sharp Road. What made these particular birds easy to see was their feeding in open plowed fields, instead of the rice stubble that normally conceals +hem from view. A+ one point I had a small group within 15 feet of my truck. Many of the males were in near-nuptial plumage, with the crown almost solid and the black breast almost complete. Most of the males, however, were In winter plumage. Even in this "dull" molt the males are striking, particularly the bright chestnut on the nape and upper wing coverts. I think the most easily distinguishable aspect "of Lapland Longspurs In the field is the flight song, which is a percussive rattle, of long duration and rapid cadence, which Is often accentuated by an explosive "tu"! These longspurs most of+en associated with Savannah Sparrows and Water Pipits In our area. Interesting is the way the Laplands hold their tails when walking In the plowed fields. They cocked the talis upward, unlike the sparrows or pipits, as If trying to keep them from getting wet or dirty. —Ted Eubanks, Jr. SPECIAL REPORTS TO THE CLEARING HOUSE January, 1978 L~ConfIrmatlon by other observers has not been reported for the three species following. Occurrence of them in the UTC is very unusual, thus they are recorded here as a "Special Report" until confirmed by additional sightings. —C H Ed.] GOSHAWK: I noted a hawk sitting in a leafless shrub on the east side of Katy-Hockley Road as I was driving north. I expected the bird to be a Marsh Hawk, judging from the size and proportions, casually estimated while driving. The car drew nearly a- breast of the bird, which then took flight and headed across some open ground to a line of barren trees some 40 yards from the roadway. I was struck by three unexpected observations: I) I thought I saw a sharp eyel'Ine as the bird turned; 2) there was no white rump patch; and 3) the flight pattern was of a few successive flaps and a sail on horizontal wings. The bird was not a Marsh Hawk. The si++ing bird was observed in +he scope in profile. The mos+ immediately arresting feature was a very distinct white superciliary line. This separated a dark brown cap from a medium dark brown face. The nape, cere and the chin were somewhat lighter in color than the face, the nape being rather a faded extension of the eyellne. The bill was dark, the iris light The robust body was heavily streaked on the breast with dark brown on off-white, the streaking less heavily continued on the flanks. The back was medium dark brown. The long whlte-tlpped +ail was coarsely banded by four or five dusky brown bands alternating with some slightly wider in a light shade. After approsimately +hree mlnu+es of observation the bird flew into the heavy trees along Cypress Creek, again with the alternating short succession of flaps and glides. I noted at the time that the bird seemed slightly heavier of body than a Marsh Hawk, and had shorter, broader rounded wings and a slightly longer tail, and was possibly larger than the average female Marsh Hawk, certainly its equal in size. I cannot make any claim to recalling details of the undertail coverts or the feathering on the tarsi. It has been my previous experience that the shagginess of the undertail coverts described in some field guides is more noticeable in adult birds where these feathers are white. These feathers have seemed dingy, certainly not white, where I have noticed them in immature birds. The immature Cooper's Hawk may also have a distinctive eyellne, but it is buffy in color and does not contrast so strongly with other facial markings as did the eyeline of this bird. The size range of the two accipiters barely overlaps. This bird was larger In size than any Cooper's Hawk. I have previously seen the Goshawk in California,