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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
Image 15
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 15. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5076.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 15. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5076

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 15, February 1978, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5076.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVI, No. 10, February 1978
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9863
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f001_002_015.jpg
Transcript Page 15 Ross' Goose: Two very small-white geese in a flock of snows and blues. Stubby reddish beaks, smaller heads In relation to size. Range about 80 yards, observed carefully with scope for about 15 minutes in afternoon of overcast day. —Larry Ballard Fulvous Whistling Duck: At same pond with Whistling Swan. Medium-sized brown ducks, with brown on backs darker than that on rest of bodies and separated by light-colored scalloped boundary. Very long light-colored legs. Birds were In mixed flock of many species of ducks and geese. They were swimming and walking on bank. We understand waterfowl are fed at this pond. —Mary Ann Chapman & Alma Barrera Greater Scaup: Slightly larger than other male scaups nearby—when he flew he had white stripe extending along trailing edge of wing, extending to very near tip of wing, distinctly longer than the stripe on the other scaup that flew at the same time. Observed at range of about 30 yards, with binocs In goodlight. —Larry Ballar All birds were "whiter" than nearby Lesser Scaups while sitting on the water. Whan flushed, white in wing feathers showed well beyond bend of the wing. Seen by a 11 three observers with binocs for up to 20 seconds. —Jim Morgan Male scaup In canal alongside Hwy 288—green head, white sides cleaner than other nearby scaup males; putting the bird to flight I could clearly see the white wing stripe extending from the secondaries well into the primaries. —Elric McHenry Similar in configuration to the Lesser Scaup except that In flight the white wing stripe of the Greater extended through the secondaries and into the primaries. Good light, binocs and scope, from as close as 100 yards, for as long as 30 seconds. — Ted Eubanks, Jr. Oldsquaw: Female—small dark bill, thin black crown, white face, dark cheek mark below and behind the eye. Dark wing and back, short tail. Observed in good light at about 25 yards for 7 minutes with binocs and scope. —Larry Ballark Drake and duck Oldsquaw In winter plumage observed by the 21 January OG field trip at the HL&P Cooling Ponds. Male—white head, neck and flanks; dark auricular patch, breast and back; white edgings to scapulars. Female—dark crown, breast and back; white head, foreneck and flanks; dark nape and auricular patch. —Ted. Eubanks, Jr White-winged Sco+er and Sco+er, species: One bird of 120 unidentified scolers swim- ming in Gulf at Rollover Pass was seen In flight through scope by David Marrack and white vlng patches were observed. —Noel PettingelI White-Winged Scoter: Three female or immature scoters at cooling ponds; dark heads and backs; lighter brown body coloration, light loral and postocular spots; white secondaries; observed from as close as 50 yards In good light with glasses and scope for 10 minutes. —Ted Eubanks, Jr. Surf Scoter and Scoter species: Three female or Immature scoters at Cooling Ponds; dark heads and backs; lighter brown body coloration; light loral and postocular spots; wings uniformly dark, lacking the white secondaries of the white-winged; observed In good light from as close as 50 yards with glasses and scope for as- long as 10 minutes. —Ted Eubanks, Jr. Scoter species: This perplexing individual was observed on at least two separate occasions at the Cooling ponds, on 21 January; this scoter was similar to the other scoters it associated with in that it possessed a dark crown and back, and the body coloration was a lighter brown. Where this bird differed, however, was in the lack of facial markings. According to Bent, there Is a stage in the molt of immature male scoters where the white facial marks are molted out and replaced by uniform dark feathering. At this stage, before the molt of the body feathers and before the development of the bills which so characterize male scoters, the birds are for all Intents indistinguishable in the field. We were able to see the bird with the wing extended, and since the secondaries were dark we were able to eliminate white- winged from possibility; since it would be impossible to specify as to whether this bird was a Surf or Black, it will have to remain a "scoter species". —Ted Eubanks Scoter species: Black sea ducks with scoter "head shapes" seen in water at 800-1200 yards with scope. —Jim Morgan Masked Duck: Female plumage (may be Immature males, according to studies)—buff cheek —with two stripes on face, the upper extended through the eye, the lower running from the lower part of the upper beak to near the back of the neck. A smalI black patch on the crown of the head. White wing patch. Observed at a range of 40 yards; swimming from behind the vegetation in the marsh. Seen for three to four minutes with binocs and scope. Bird disappeared In a hurry when a large truck roared down the highway. —Larry Ballard