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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 7. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5068.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5068

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 7, February 1978, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5068.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVI, No. 10, February 1978
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9863
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f001_002_007.jpg
Transcript species If safely Identifiable in the field, are as follows: Page 7 The key fleldmarks for the Arctic Loor (1) The Arctic Loon is a small species of loon, with the body length averaging over six Inches less than the Common. There are many Common Loons, however, that are considerably smaller than the average, some approaching the Arctic In body size. This fleldmark, therefore, cannot be considered reliable on its own in the field. (2) The bill of the Arctic Loon is quite short, averaging over 40% shorter than the Common. Mclntyre and Mclntyre (Auk, Vol. 91, pp. 413-415), however, have shown the existence of a considerable overlap (be+ween 55 and 65 mm.) be+ween certain Arctic and Common Loon individuals. A mark to look for Is the diameter of the bill at Its base, for the Arctic Loon will average a much thinner bi11 base than the Common Loon. (3) Mcln+yre and Mcln+yre s+a+e +ha+ "aI I Arc+Ic Loons (60) taken from September to March had uniform gray plumage above and anterior to the eyes". Out of 54 Common Loons examined by the pair, only 4_ (around 7.2?) lacked a definite pattern of white feathering around the eye. ~Used In conjunction with the rest of the series this fleldmark is essential to a posl+ive iden+ifica+ion. (4) Arc+Ic Loons in winter often have a nape that is a distinctly lighter gray than the back (watch the angle and intensity of +he sun, for a shine or gleam off +he nape can be deceiving). The back is usually uniformly dark, al+hough Pough says +ha+ +he "young....have a light edging to the back; feathers which produces a scaled effect". The contrast between the blackish upper parts and the white under parts is somewhat greater than in other loons. (Oberholser). (5) The Arctic Loon has a graceful posture, with the head held up and away from the body, and the neck formed Into a uniform curve. C) Red-throated Loon- The Red-throated Loon, Gavla. itellata, Is a rare but regular winter resident on the UTC. This small loon, the most diminutive of the genus in North America, Is observed most often at the Texas City Dike, with as many as three and four individuals being seen in one day. The Red-throated Loon, unlike the Arctic and Common, possesses a clearly distinguishable series of fleldmarks which should make field Identification much easier than with the previous species. The key field- marks for the Red-throated Loon are as follows: (I) The Red-throated Loon Is considerably.smaIler than the Common Loon, being much closer to the size of a Mallard than to a cormorant. Although the Red-throated nearly matches the Arctic In body length, In actual bulk size It Is much slImmer. O) The bill of the Red-throated Loon is sharply pointed, exceedingly thin and has a lower mandible which curves distinctly upward. The length of the Arctic Loon's bill is comparable to that of the Red-throated. (3) The back of the Red-throated Loon In winter Is gray and is covered with white spots or "stars". The specific name itell/ita comes from the Latin "stel la+us", which Is also +he root for the English "s+ella+e", meaning s+udded wi+h s+ars. (4) The Red-+hroa+ed Loon holds l+s neck straight and extended. The bill is usually held at an upward angle, giving the bird a "haughty" look. Remember, a single fleldmark alone Is meaningless when attempting to Identify winter loons. As with other field problems an observer must "build a case" for positive Identification. An identification based oh the careful observation and meticulous written detailing of the entire series of fieldmarks is irrefutable. AROUND AND ABOUT [Following Is a letter I want to share with you from Dorothy and David Lefkovitz, former OG members who now live in Douce++e, a few miles nor+h of Woodvllle, Texas] "Our bird world has been busy and Interesting, especially this winter since about 15 Evening Grosbeaks have been feeding here and this must be the year of the Pine Siskins. While the snow was on the ground so many of the birds found our porch to be a good shelter, Including the Phoebe who shopped for food under the eaves and sat on the wood supply we keep on the porch. "Dr. James Jinnette, a dentist here, had an interesting incident at his office on the ,12th and 13th of January. A Cedar Waxwing fa+ally flew In+o one of his floor length windows and l+s body fell in+o a low hedge beneath the window. Within a very few minutes another Cedar Waxwing came to sit by its dead companion. Even though Dr. Jin nette and his staff would go out and check on It quite often the bird never moved. Food and water was put near but, as far as they know, it made no effort to eat or drink. " It sat there almost exactly 23 hours, le++Ing people come wl+hln three or four Inches of It. Since the hedge Is about I 1/2 feet high a careful look-out was kept for cats