Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
Image 6
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 6. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5067.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5067

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 6, February 1978, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5067.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVI, No. 10, February 1978
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9863
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f001_002_006.jpg
Transcript Page 6 THE LEARNING CORNER L"ThIs is a new sec+lon +ha+ your edl+or predlc+s will become one of +he most popular par+s of THE SPOONBILL. We all can use help in Iden+lfication of birds, and In the months to come we hope to present, through contributing members and subscribers, some assisting hints beyond the field guides most of us are so dependent upon. We want to deal with birds that are currently being seen at the time of publication of the item, or wi11 be seen shortly afterwards. We are delighted to start things off with Fred Collins' clarification of "hovering", and Ted Eubanks' assistance In "straightening out" the loons. Please Join us In THE LEARNING CORNER as a contributor as well as a reader. —Ed.] Note .for February SPOONBILL from Fred Col I Ins '.-;-,-,-; One of my New Year resolutions Is to become a regular contributor to THE SPOONBILL. This first effort of the year Is stimulated by the new Christmas Count held by Tony Gallucci on January 2 In West Houston. I covered the North WIIcrest-Westhelmer area and was fortunate enough to find the Rough-legged Hawk, previously reported, and two White-tailed Kites. These two species are characterized by hovering flights. The Rough-legged Hawk is often confused with the highly variable Red-tail Hawk. One "field mark" often considered is this undefined aspect of hovering. The Golden Press Guide BIrds of North America states that the Red-tail "rarely hovers". Anyone that has spent more, than a few hours watching Red-tails knows how misleading this statement Is. However If we define hovering and contrast It with another type of stationary flight, fluttering, the statement in the afore mentioned guide may be valid. With proper definition Red- tails rprely, if ever, hover and consequently hovering can become a useful field characteristic. I consider hovering as that type of s+a+lonary flight in which the wings are held in a plane near perpendicular wl+h the body. The mos+ familiar hovering bird In our area is +he White-tailed Kite. The wings are held above the head pointing up In a "V". The body Is dropped to a vertical position, and the tail Is turned down almost perpendicular to the ground. This posture Is accentuated by the Kite dangling its legs. The Rough-legged Hawk exhibits the same features In its hovering posture. Similarly, the body proportions are similar to the Kite, narrow wings and relatively Iong ta11. The Red-tail when fluttering holds a stationary position but keeps the body In a horizontal plane, the same as the wings. The tips of the wings move, the Inner portions maintain a soaring position In the wind. The +all never falls far below the body plane. The wings are relatively broad and tail proportionate. It Is noteworthy that Roger T. Peterson doesn't list the Red-tail as a similar species in the Rough-1 egged. his account of Winter Identification of Texas Loons by Ted L. Eubanks Jr. A) Common Loon- The Common Loon, Gauia, JmmeA, is by far the most abundant loon in the UTC during winter. This loon begins arriving on the wintering grounds near the first of October, and lingers as late as the middle of May. The Common Loon on the UTC usually frequents salt or brackish water, favoring such spots as the HL&P cooling ponds, Texas City Dike and Offatt Bayou, Key Identification marks for the Common Loon are as follows: (1) Large body size, nearing the Double-crested Cormorant (a species with which It associates In winter) In total body length. Many Common Loons, however, are considerably smaller than this "text-book" size, so the body size in itself does not constitute a reliable fieldmark. (2) Massive bill, particularly in regards to the thickness at the base. (3) White feathering above and anterior to the eye, often giving the impression of an eye-ring. (4) Nape and back are uniform In their charcoal-gray coloration. (5) An overall heavy-headed appearance, much greater than the neck Itself. (6) The Common Loon typically holds its head low and close to the body, the bil lzontal, in a configura+ion that +o me resembles "crouching". B) Arctic Loon- The Arctic Loon, Gavia. aActica, is a western species which rarely ventures Into Texas. In the UTC most of the substantiated records come from the Texa: City Dike, the most recent being this year (bird photographed by H. Hobart). In many aspects, particularly in size, the Arctic Loon, resembles the small race of Common Loon. With careful a++en+Ion +o the entire series of fieldmarks, however, this dth the diame+er of the head being obvlousl hor-