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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 3. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5064.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5064

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978 - Image 3, February 1978, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5082/show/5064.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 26, No. 10, February 1978
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVI, No. 10, February 1978
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9863
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f001_002_003.jpg
Transcript ^^ Page 3 Rick Taylor believes +ha+ there is an adult pair and an Immature pair, and that the adults are trying to drive the Immatures from their territory. The most reasonable Inference to be drawn from the available facts Js that a pair of trogons moved Into the region from Mexico, bred tn a relatively remote side-canyon, and raised two young. They did not descend Into areas that were populated until the Autumn frosts began to kill off the insects upon which they fed, and forced them to lower elevations where the Madrones were abundant. This Is a sounder conclusion than that four birds, two lmma+ures and two adults, moved In Independently. During our six-day s+ay, Dr. Spofford's telephone was ringing off the wall: eager birders from California, Florida, New York and other states too numerous to mention, were trying to find out If the birds could be seen. On hearing that they had, many hopped Into cars and drove non-stop, or got the next plane to Tucson and hired a car there. One official from the Department of the Interior, on learning that the birds were present, took the night plane from Washington to Tucson and was there the next morning. Since the bird was first seen over six hundred people have signed the list that has been placed at the entrance to Trogon trail, although relatively few of them have seen the bird. Among those who have Is Rep. Morris Udall. Unfortunately Roger Tory Peterson was unable to get away because of other commitments—of the 34 species of trogon he has seen all but this one. Cave Creek is visited by 25,000 people annually who come just to see the Elegant trogon, which can be seen elsewhere since only six of the 25 pairs breeding In the U.S. live there. Since the Eared trogon can be seen only there, the mind boggles at the influx to be expected in 1978. Editor's comment: The following is in THE TROGON NEWS, Huachuca Audubon Society newsletter: iTAn Eared Trogon was first noted on the Mile HI property by Be++y Jones on Dec. I. 1+ was subsequently seen there on Dec. 3 by Dr. Chuck McMoran, Sml++y, Don Bass, Cindy Davison, and George Berlnger. Sml++y recorded I+s call. 1+ has no+ been seen since. The Eared Trogons a+ South Fork of Cave Creek Canyon were apparently also last seen around that time". This was from the February Issue. We are delighted to add THE TROGON NEWS to our list of exchange newsletters, by the way. As far as we know, Paul and Phyllis Nimmons are the only OG members among the lucky ones of the 600 who sought the trogon. Quotes from a columnist, Pete Cowgill, writing for a Tucson newspaper: " The presence of the eared trogon will probably add fuel to the fire generated by some local residents of Cave Creek to have the Forest Service designate the canyon as a wildlife habitat management area. Essentially, this would mean no new developments on the public land In the canyon. It might even mean restrictions on public entry Into parts of the canyon. (See November, 1977 THE SPOONBILL). Which brings up the question, "How much human disturbance can the eared trogon stand before it leaves the canyon?" And not just this bird but the estimated 12 pairs of coppery-tailed trogons which live there "Right now I don't think the pressure from birders Is too great", said Rick Taylor. "But It will be. a different matter next summer when the trogons breed and nest. I know of at least 10 nests which had to be abandoned by the birds because of Interference by photographers. The people were too busy trying to get pictures to pay attention to the alarm calls which the birds were crying. The photographers should have backed off when they heard the call. But they didn't and the birds left". CSee editorial on birding ethics. Responsibilities and Enjoyment of Birding, In December, 1976 THE SPOONBILL.) INTERESTING COURSE COMING UP AT SPRING BRANCH The Continuing Education Department of Spring Branch School District Is offering a 6-sessIon course on "Bird Families". Aimed at beginning birders, this course will endeavor to acquaint them with the hows and whys certain birds are grouped Into a "family" so that In the field they can quickly start Identification of a bird by Immediately placing It In the proper family. This is something that often gets passed over when one starts birding, but it Is an Important base In Identification. Half of the first session, Saturday, March 4, will be devoted to an explanation of family groupings, with slides showing examples. The remainder of that session, and all other sessions will be Saturday field trips, four half-day and two all-day. Randy Beavers will conduct the course, and says he has room left for about 10 more people. The cost Is $45, and If you are Interested he asks that you call him before March I, a+ 465-9628.