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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Image 10
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 10. February 1983 - March 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5015.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1983 - March 1983). The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 10. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5015

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 10, February 1983 - March 1983, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5015.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXII, No. 2, February - March 1983
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1983 - March 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9868
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f016_002_010.jpg
Transcript 10 is a migratory species, it still picks up considerable insecticide on its trip south. Many of the birds eaten by Peregrines within the United States are also migrants and contain considerable quantities of insecticide. Enderson has noted however that the eggshells of the birds are beginning to thicken again and there is some optimism that they will make a comeback. South of Canada, the nesting Peregrines have been more severely reduced in the United States than in any comparable sized area of the world. It is estimated that no more than 5-10 per cent of the original population remains. Conservationists have recognized that a significant recovery in numbers by strictly natural processes is unlikely due to the greatly diminished populations and the vast stretches of vacant habitat now separating the few surviving natural pairs. All of the official recovery plans of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service depend for their success on the establishment of captive produced falcons as the only likely way to increase the density and extend the distribution of breeding peregrines. During the 1982 season the captive females produced a total of 202 peregrines. In the Rocky Mountains and adjacent western states, the Peregrine Fund received reports of 24 returning adults seen at cliff-side eyries or at hack-towers, including members of nine pairs. However, only one pair laid eggs, but even so it is believed that the decline in Colorado has been arrested. The Peregrine Fund has begun to extend the distribution and increase the numbers of potential nesters in northern Utah and Wyoming. Hopefully, before too many more years these magnificent birds will be restored to their former place in the avifauna of North America. POSSIBLE NEW ENDANGERED SPECIES Allan J. Muellar As we all know, the upper Texas coast (UTC) is an excellent birding area both in terms of numbers and rarities. This fact was recently reinforced when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published in the Federal Register a Notice of Review of species under consideration for listing on the federal endangered species list. Several of these species are common or at least regular on the upper Texas coast. The Notice of Review is in part a request for information. There is some existing information that indicates that thesi species may be endangered or threatened, but more is needed before a decision can be reached. Since several of these species do occur in our area, you can assist by reporting any significant observations. Listed below are the species or subspecies under consideration that occur in the upper Texas coast, some status information for each species mostly taken from Oberholster's "The Bird Life of Texas", and the kind of information that would be useful. Reddish Egret (Egretta refuscens) Common in the United States only on the Texas coast. Nesting is monitored by the Texas Fish-eating Bird Survey. Any unusual concentrations or areas of regular use are of interest. Wood Stork (Mycteria americana) Most of our birds are probably nonbreeding immatures and post breeding season wanderers from Mexico, but there are three UTC breeding records. Any nests, night roost locations, or large (25+) flocks are of interest. American Swallow-Tailed Kite (Elanoides forficatus forficatus) Formerly a fairly common breeding bird, but declined rapidly from 1900-1910. The cause of the declind is ^-—x unknown. All sightings are of interest. ^mW