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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Image 9
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 9. February 1983 - March 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5014.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1983 - March 1983). The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 9. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5014

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 9, February 1983 - March 1983, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5014.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXII, No. 2, February - March 1983
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1983 - March 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9868
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f016_002_009.jpg
Transcript To wrap it up, Cozumel is great for a cheap thrill in tropical birding. These days one person can visit the island as we did for under $300 (including round-trip airfare, hotel accommodations, transportation and meals). Although it is not well represented with the great diversity of tropical families, it does offer certain species virtually impossible from San Luis Potosi northward (areas in Mesico most often visited by UTC birders). I would recommend it to anyone as an introduction to tropical birding or to those with experience limited to northern Mexico. •HIGH COUNTRY PEREGRINES Dr. Larry N. White From December 29 thru January 3, I had the pleasure of visiting Dr. James Enderson of Colorado Springs, Colorado. Enderson, Professor of Biology at Colorado College, has been actively working for the last 20 years helping restore the Peregrine Falcon to its former range in the Rocky Mountains. Since my arrival was only a few days after the great Denver blizzard, I wasn't very optimistic about seeing many birds. However, as a neophyte birder nearly anything that I saw would more than likely be a lifer. So, while accompanying Dr. Enderson on his routine errands around Colorado Springs, I made sure to carry my binoculars. This wasn't a bad idea, since just driving through town allowed me to see Black-billed Magpie, Gray headed Junco, Dark eyed Junco, Tree Sparrow, House Finch, and Scrub Jay. Friday morning, New Year's Eve, dawn clear and cool (about 2°F). Dr. Enderson decided that we would ride out west of town on the prairie and try to capture a Prairie Falcon or Merlin. While cruising the roads across the snow covered prairie we found four or five Prairie Falcons perched atop the telephone poles as well as an occasional Rough-legged Hawk, but my greatest tjj^.1 was seeing a large adult Golden Eagle perched in a tree 100 yards off the road. Merlin appeared to be much more plentiful on the Colorado prairies than along the coast here in Texas. In our two or three hours of cruising the roads, we saw four birds, whereas I've only seen one in the last four months along the coast. Horned Lark appeared to be the most common bird on the prairie. We saw numerous flocks of 15-20 birds. On New Year's Day we took a short trip into the foothills of the Rockies to a scenic area known as Garden of the Gods. Birding here was disappointing, but we did find Townsend's Solitaire, Scrub Jay, Rufous-sided Towhee, Mountain and Black- capped Chicakee, White-breasted Nuthatch, Northern Shrike, numerous Junco, and Common Raven. Sunday, January 2 was another beautiful day so we took a trip down to Royal Gorge, a large canyon along the Arkansas River. The picnic grounds were our destination, and although the scenery was breathtaking, the birding was again disappointing. Mountain Bluebird was the only new finding. Before we left the area we did drive down to Canyon City and walked the railroad tracks adjacent to the Arkansas River. Here we found three dippers, and watched as they plunged into the icy water for food. In a thicket along the tracks we also saw several Song Sparrows in a group of Grey-headed Juncos. Monday January 3 was to be my last full day in Colorado. Since Dr. Enderson and I are both pilots, he wanted to take me for a short ride in his airplane. We took off from a small airport west of town and headed out over the prairie and quickly found four more Golden Eagles as well as several Rough-legged Hawks. Enderson claims that there is no shortage of Golden Eagles in Colorado. In fact they have been one of the biggest problems with re-establishing the Peregrines in the Rockies. Golden Eagles and Great Horned Owls are the major predators of the young fledgling Peregrines. Enderson has been studying egg shell problems in the Peregrines for years. Even though DDT and its analogs are no longer legal for use within the United States, many of our neighbors to the south are still using it. Since the Peregrine