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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Image 8
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 8. February 1983 - March 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5013.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1983 - March 1983). The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 8. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5013

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 8, February 1983 - March 1983, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5013.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXII, No. 2, February - March 1983
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1983 - March 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9868
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f016_002_008.jpg
Transcript on the UTC: many American Redstarts and Palm Warblers, Yellow- throated, Blue-winged, Blackburnian, and Ovenbird Warblers, N. Waterthrush, Hooded Warbler, and I saw one Cape May Warbler. We also found two Golden Warblers, a tropical "cousin" of our Yellow Warbler and very much like it except for more intense reddish breast streaks and a rusty cap. In and around the hotel were many Bahama Honeycreepers, all of the Cozumel race with white throats. "Cheaters" in the coevolution between plant and pollinater, these honeycreepers would sip nectar from holes punctured at the base of hibiscus flowers. A male Fork-tailed Emerald, exhibiting the aggressiveness so typical of all hummers, tried to maintain exclusive access to a beautiful red hibiscus right outside our room. His stunning underside was velvety in appearance, the green glittering against jet black. A Southern House Wren (the so- called "Cozumel Wren") snuck cautiously around our patio on search of food, or perhaps looking for a potential nest site. It was slightly larger than a House Wren and intensely rusty- brown in color, like a cross between House and Carolina Wrens. We heard a Pauraque chorus each night from our patio. I had hoped to see Orange Orioles during our stay but, alas, the only orioles found were a pair of Hoodeds' in a. palm at the hote. The most common bird in open developed areas, like the airport and around our hotel, was Tropical Mockingbird. Patricia and I were amazed at the striking difference between this and our northern species. Their long tails, with more white laterally, are flicked so smoothly upward upon landing that they seem to be moving in slow motion. The same holds true for the graceful beating of their wings in flight. Great-tailed Grackles were also common and luckily confined in this habitat. Common, and more commonly Ruddy, Ground-Doves flocked together in open areas of more rural settings. Tropical Kingbirds were numerous along the paved road as were Roadside Hawks. Never before had I been so impressed by the tiny size of these buteos. A field in front of the airport is a good place to see Green-breasted Mango, second of two common hummingbirds on Cozumel. We found a nice male maintaining his territorial vigil from a cedar tree at the end of a long row of flowering shrubs. From our angle he appeared almost all black except for an irridescent green stripe extending from his bill down each side. When feeding, his ample tail was a pulsating bright purple. Just after this sighting an adult Swainson's Hawk soared overhead, a familiar but unexpected bird for me. Also at the airport a Bat Falcon jetted over us at dusk one evening. In more dense jungle habitat the most numerous species was Black Catbird. This bird is just what its name implies and it was rewarding to see them on a few occasions together with wintering Gray Catbirds. We found two Cozumel Vireos along unimproved road to El Cedral, one of many Mayan ruins on the island. This little endemic is sort of a rust-colored version of our White-eyed Vireo, which we also saw on the trip. I had hoped to see a Yucatan Woodpecker in the jungle but I succeeded in finding only a Golden-fronted. One thing that truly amazed me about this island so close to the Yucatan shore was the paucity of coastal birds. Laughing Gulls were most numerous but even they could be easily counted, and only a few Sandwich and Royal Terns leisured back and forth over the docks in town. Other than these we saw very little. Frigatebirds soared by infrequently (at least relative to what I've seen on the Pacific coast), and we saw only a few Brown Pelicans. I spotted one immature Herring Gull feeding with several frigatebirds out over the surf on the Caribbean side. In the lagoons we found Least Grebe and the same wading birds one would expect on the UTC, including one spoonbill. This article would not be complete without some mention of the fantastic skin diving we enjoyed on the island. After all, reef fishes are just underwater versions of birds, and equally challenging to identify. We saw quite a diversity, ranging from brightly colored triggerfishes and damsels to incredibly cryptic flounders encircled by ornate fins, one barracuda in close proximity, a couple of skates, and even a polka-dotte| eel. '•