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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Image 7
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 7. February 1983 - March 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5012.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1983 - March 1983). The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5012

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 7, February 1983 - March 1983, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5012.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXII, No. 2, February - March 1983
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1983 - March 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9868
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f016_002_007.jpg
Transcript On the positive side, the habitat around the ruins at Palenque and in the state of Yucatan was found to be the same as it was 2% years ago. Also, much wilderness and birding habitat remains around El Naranjo, probably one of the most extensive areas of good habitat remaining in Mexico. But even here, Ben Feltner has noticed recent thinning of the oaks. In spite of diminishing habitat much good birding remains in Mexico, as can be seen by a two-week trip list of 357 species. However, the sooner you can bird Mexico, the better your chances will be to enjoy the marvelous avifauna of our southern neighbors. HONEYMOON BIRDING IN COZUMEL Randy Pinkston Active birders, like all people who must invest considerable time and effort in their hobby in order to really enjoy it, receive maximum enjoyment birding either alone or in the company of casual - or non-birders without feeling inconsiderate, stubborn, or whatever. This can be a problem on vacations or other trips when time is limited and interests are varied. Compromise is a great solution. My bride, Patricia, and I were married on December 11th of last year. She is one of those people who can create interest in almost anything but she is not a birder. We made plans for a 3-day honeymoon on Cozumel Island and I, as a fairly active birder, was aware of the birding potential there. Right away I began researching potential lifers and where I could find them. I felt a little inconsiderate even before we left Houston. After all, this was to be our honeymoon. I should have been dreaming of kissing and candlelight dining. As it all turned out Patricia was very understanding, as usual, and I compromised a bit myself. The result was 3 full days of pure enjoyment on the island. Cozumel is located in the Caribbean Sea just offshore from Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. It is about 30 miles long, north and south, and 12 miles wide, composed chiefly of calcite, and fringed with coral reefs. The surrounding water is crystal clear and beautiful blue in color. Cozumel has one fair-sized town, San Miguel, which lies on the Yucatan side where there is also a decent commercial airport. I was surprised at the nature of the island's habitats. Words like "arid" and "sparse", which I had expected to use in describing them, were dropped and replaced by the words "lush" and "dense". Much of the periphery is broken with flooded mangroves and tidal lagoons. On higher ground we found dense jungle habitat with an almost impenetrable understory. We rented a motor-scotter the first morning and this proved to be an excellent mode of transportation for exploring the island. It cost us about $12 per day, including fuel and insurance, but Patty bargained with the Mexicans in her native Peruvian Spanish. Another couple, neither of whom spoke much Spanish, paid well over twice that much! Jeeps can also be rented for a small fortune. Insects can be a problem on the paved road at night (I was a case of the classic "happy motorcyclist" after riding 15 miles back to the hotel one evening.). We stayed at the Hotel el Presidente which I recommend highly. One wing of the hotel is only one story and each room has sliding glass doors which open onto a stone-rimmed patio. Ours faced a large lawn bordered with flowering shrubs such as hibiscus. This gave me great birding opportunities right from the room. I was enraged when we saw our first bird of the trip - Myrtle Warbler. That species is my candidate for the most ubiquitous winter bird on the UTC and to com 800+ miles only to find it first was too much for me to take. I began searching desperately for something more interesting and soon found several Palm Warblers and Yellow-faced Grassquits feeding together on the lawn outside our room. It was interesting to later find several wintering warblers which are mainly migrants