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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Image 6
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 6. February 1983 - March 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5011.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1983 - March 1983). The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5011

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 6, February 1983 - March 1983, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5011.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXII, No. 2, February - March 1983
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1983 - March 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9868
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f016_002_006.jpg
Transcript accumulated list. One of the new species was a Red-legged Honeycreeper. During our stay at Teziutlan we saw Emerald Toucanet, Unicolored Jay, Hooded Yellow throat, Blue-crowned Chlorophonia, White-naped and Chestnut-capped Brush-finchers, among many wintering neotropical migrants. This was accomplished in spite of the generally miserable weather. Tony was also lucky enough to see the Azure-hooded Jay, which I missed. Our next stop was Catemaco and we again had bad weather - first a light mist, then rain, rain, rain. We did manage a few good species though, like White Hawk, Collared Aracari, Keel-billed Toucan, and Lovely Cotinga. I was fortunate to get excellent looks at a "most wanted" species - the Black-throated Shrike-Tanager. Because of the bad weather, we cut our stay short and headed for Palenque. On the way we added Yellow-headed Vulture, Great Black Hawk and Plain-breasted Ground Dove. At Palenque the next day we saw our first sunshine in 10 daysl This also provided us with excellent birding. In the morning we had a beautiful White Hawk soaring over the ruins, Barred Woodcreeper, Black-crowned Tityra, Black-cowled Oriole, among many Mexican and neotropical migrant species. The best bird of the morning came as we were birding a jungle trail. I rounded a corner with Tony right behind, and right in front of me in the trail, at a small water crossing, was this plump, almost tail-less bird with long legs. I knew immediately what it was, but because of the excitement, I could only get half a word out...uh-uh-PITTA! Here was something I have been wanting to see since I first started birding the neotropics, an Antpittal It was the Scaled Antpitta, a beautiful but very secretive bird which, nevertheless, provided full back and side views at about 20 feet. What a nifty findl In the late morning we were joined by John Barrera and Simon Perkins, the two Massachusetts birders we met at El Naranjo. After birding some more around the ruins, with Tony fortunate to see the Green Shrike-Vireo, the four of us birded a road outside Palenque. Along this road we found Bare-throated Tiger Heron, Aplomado Falcon, and 31 Double- striped Thick-Knees, plus numerous buntings and finches. The next morning we birded along the Ocosingo Highway before setting off towards the Ucatan Peninsula. By evening we reached Uxmal after numerous birding stops through marshes and Thorn- scrub habitat. On the way we had excellent looks at Yucatan (Yellow-lored) Parrots. In the Yucatan we birded around the ruins of Uxmal, Kabah, Labna, Xlapak and Sayil. While we didn't turn up anything unusual it was most enjoyable to watch such beautiful specie ■■ as Turquoise-browed Motmot, Yucatan Jay, and Oranage Oriole. In this area neotropical migrants really dominated the scene. Wintering vireos and warblers were most numerous. Also in great abundance were Ferruginous Pygmy Owls. Using a tape of their call, we carefully counted 24^ of these little owls in one day of birding, and we got looks at 1_2 of these, two of which were sitting shoulder-to-shoulder on a branch. We finished our two week trip with a tally of 357 species, including 28 species of raptors, and 33 species of warblers. Considering bad weather much of the way, this was a respectable total. Other than the weather, the only other problem I had during the trip was fighting off a few days worth of depression and sadness. For the forests of Mexico continue to fall. In areas I birded just 2h years ago, there was obvious and sometimes extensive, clearing. This was most evident along the Ocosingo Highway, especially in the area of the Las Cascadas (waterfall) which is now a national park (!), and in the thorn-scrub forest area of Northern Campeche. In the latter area, several tracts of hundreds of acres were bulldozed down to bare earth. The previously beautiful area known as Las Cas<jj just off the Ocosingo Highway has had all the understory cleared out and the trees thinned. In an area where I viewed Blue-Black Grosbeak and Violet Sabrewing on my last trip, only a Wood thrush could be found. This is a national park? :'^fe