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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 5. February 1983 - March 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5010.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1983 - March 1983). The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5010

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983 - Image 5, February 1983 - March 1983, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5022/show/5010.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feburary - March, 1983
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXII, No. 2, February - March 1983
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1983 - March 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9868
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f016_002_005.jpg
Transcript A TWO WEEK BLITZ OF EASTERN MEXICO Jim Morgan On December 28, Tony Gullucci and I flew to Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, in northeastern Mexico. We picked up a rental car, stayed overnight there, and set off the next morning for Ciudad Mante. The morning broke cold and misty, a weather condition that was to follow us around for more than a week! We opted not to go straight to Mante, and instead, we came "in the back door" by birding our way through the El Naranjo count circle from west to east. Once in the foothills, the wl^mm%fr became miserable - cold, damp, mist and clouds. We tr^Sxfh about the prospects of this weather staying through the next day which was El Naranjo Christmas Count Day! It did not look good. We arrived at Mante about 7:00 p.m. to find about 14 other birders, including OG'ers Ben Feltner (El Naranjo compiler), Linder Roach, Wes Cureton, and Bob Behrstock, the latter leadinq a NE Mexico Peregrine tour. Also, our good friend Wayne Shifflett (Attwater NWR Manager) was there and two birders from Massachusetts, one of which was very experienced with neotropical birds. On count day Wayne Shifflett joined Tony and I to cover the entire eastern portion of the count circle. This did provide us the advantage of being in the lowlands and out of the clouds. Also, it is an area of the count circle Tony and I know very well. It wasn't too far into the day before we realized we were going to have a good day, but we didn't realize how good! As the day progressed we found the Bare-throated Tiger Heron along the river, an Orange-billed Nightengale-Thrush, and Crimson-collared Grosbeak among the many species which were being seen. By early afternoon we realized we were having a big raptor day as we had picked up most the usual species plus a nifty, perched Collared Forrest-Falcon and an equally exciting, perched Laughing Falcon. By 5:00 p.m. we had 17 species of rj^ftvs and were making our way out of the southeast corner of tfr^^Cxrcle to try and make the f al Is to see the swi f ts come in. At 5:15 p.m. Tony spotted a large white spot on a heavily forrested hillside. We stopped and got the scope on it and we knew we had something good! It was a raptor, and it was obviously HUGE! On its perch it showed immaculate white underparts and all black head, neck, back and upper wings. Cooperating beyond belief, the bird took flight and its immense proportions had us in awe! Immediately noticeable were the white underwing linings and black flight feathers. This pattern was familiar to me and led me to call out what it looked like but we remained a little confused with the black head, neck and upperparts. Also, in flight the bird showed an all black tail. The bird returned to its perch and then walked up the branch, as vultures tend to do. We were then convinced of our identification - the bird was a sub-adult KING VULTURE! WOW! A check of field guides and reference material cleared up confusing plumage characteristics as young King Vultures can start out almost entirely black and progressively obtain the white parts of their plumage and also the change of head and neck colors. Among the three observers only I had seen the species before and my previous sighting was a full adult plumaged bird just this last year in Panama. To the best of our knowledge this El Naranjo observation is the most northerly sighting of this species in modern times. Needless to say, it was also THE bird of the count. The next morning we said goodbye to many of the Houston birders and Tony and I followed Bob Behrstock and his group south. Our destination was Teziutlan but we were going to overnight in Tuxpan. We made occasional birding stops along the way and on January 1, we arrived in Teziutlan among heavy, wet clouds (again!). The next day Tony and I had the eastern third of the Teziutlan count circle for the Christmas count being held that day. Again, this was ^n advantage because we wore in the lowest part of the count circle, and, with a little effort, we were able to stay out of the clouds and mist. Tony and I logged 92 species on the day, including about 20 species of warblers and we added about five now species to this young count's