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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1925
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1925 - Image 1. February 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4753/show/4749.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1925 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4753/show/4749

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1925 - Image 1, February 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4753/show/4749.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_002_001.jpg
Transcript **R_ft THE P H Y R Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, Texas. Vol. 2, No. February, 1925 But let us keep some virgin wild Where lakes, to silence given, Reflect the sun and moon and stars, In beauty back to'heaven:- That men may walk,' as I have walked, Upon the mossgrown sod, And view in unspoiled sylvan ways The handiwork of God'. -- John Wingfield Gatewood. Bravo ,' Holland' s! "The fight has been made, the victory won. Within a year's time, the readers of Holland's Magazine, through their seal and unselfish interest, have pledged 3,858/798 acres as bird sanctuaries, or a total of somewhat over 4,'465 square milest This vast domain, on which no hunting will be permitted for five years, is as large as Rhode Island and Delaware/ with 847 square miles to spare. It is safe to assume that Holland's readers and well wishers have set aside a greater area in refuges than has ever been pledged through any agency within a year's time, and this claim gains weight when one considers that the national parks, established by the Government, total but 11/372 square miles." The paragraph quoted above is the introduction to an amazing story of achievement that every lover'of the outdoors should read. Holland's Magazine for February, 1935, is more than an unusually interesting magazine; it is a milestone upon the upward path of wild life conservation,' a marker upon which all may look and appreciate the wonderful progress that has been made. The work has been done, the results gathered and published, and the prizes awarded. To Holland's itself goes tho greatest prize - the satisfaction of completing a magnificent work and the admiration and gratitude of thinking people everywhere. Our Scenic Assets No sane person could imagine such a foolish procedure as plugging up "Old Faithful" geyser, diverting the vast volume of water' that makes Niagara's mighty spectacle, or filling in the Grand Canyon, if it were possible to do so. It seems strange, therefore, that Houston residents do not realize the utter foolishness ef destroying the native ornamental trees, shrubs and wild flowers which are the main features of our scenery. Regardless of Houston's ideal location from a commercial viewpoint and the prosperity of its industries, people would not care to live here, :'or even' to visit our city, if it were a dull and colorless place, devoid of beauty and interest. One of the purposes of the Outdoor Nature Club is to publish far and wide the fact that the same wide waters upon which ocean-going ships advanct to our doors sparkle in numerous tributary streams winding through woodlands scented with the breath of flowers and vibrant with the songs of birds; that the far-stretohing prairies over which our herds of cattle roam are carpeted with blossoms of many hues; and that'delightful pleasures of the outdoors in an equally delightful clime go hand in hand with golden opportunities for material progress and success. Broad driveways make accessible to all the picturesque curves of our winding bayous, the haunting beauty of our flower filled woodlands and the colorful life of our sun-kissed prairies. While we bend our energy to the pleasant task of bedecking, the city for the convention of advertising men from the four corners of the earth, the dogwood and the wild plum will blossom out, the haw and the redbud will proclaim spring, and countless other flowers will burst into bloom. Then let us remember that these woodland works of art ■ are tangible assets to our city, and do what we can to prevent their destruction by the thoughtless or unknowing.