Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 6, August 1999
Image 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 6, August 1999 - Image 3. August 1999. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/463/show/459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1999). The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 6, August 1999 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/463/show/459

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 6, August 1999 - Image 3, August 1999, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/463/show/459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 6, August 1999
Contributor (Local)
  • Smith, Donna Kay
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date August 1999
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9884
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f001_005_003.jpg
Transcript the west. Winds from the west dumped many interesting birds onto St. Paul including quite a few Wood Sandpipers, three Common Greenshanks, two nicely seen Gray-tailed Tattlers, two Ruffs in breeding plumage, a Long-toed Stint, and a lone Common Sandpiper. We also enjoyed great looks at a McKay's Bunting and some female King Eiders. We spent four nights in Nome and loved every minute of our stay on the Seward Peninsula. From our windows in the Nugget Inn or from the cafe, we watched sheets of ice packed along the shore ofthe Bering Sea. On the drive up the Kougarak Road north out of Nome, we were treated to a brief, heavy snowstorm, displaying Bristle-thighed Curlews, Gyrfalcons on and around the nest, and a stunning view of a male Bluethroat singing and displaying. Some ofthe more common birds around Nome included Red-throated Loon, Rough-legged Hawk, Bar-tailed Godwit, Pacific-Golden Plover, Long-tailed Jaeger, Glaucous Gull, Rock and Willow Ptarmigan, Gray-cheeked Thrush, Yellow Wagtails, Lapland Longspur, and Common and Hoary Redpolls. Apparently, the late Spring resulting in so much ice kept the Aleutian Terns out at sea. On an evening outing, we watched Pomarine and Parasitic Jaegers, of both phases, feeding on a carcass close to shore. Along with the ever present Long-tailed Jaegers, this provided a great opportunity to study and watch these three species almost side by side. On our bus trip to Eielson Visitor Center in the heart of Denali National Park, we were treated to warm weather, partial views of Mt. McKinley, Grizzly Bears galore, Dall Sheep, Hoary Marmot, Caribou, Red Fox, Snowshoe Hare, Golden Eagle, Gyrfalcon on and flying around the nest, and two Northern Shrikes. It was also amazing to watch a Grizzly Bear carrying a young Moose in its mouth as the female Moose watched helplessly: what a drama. It wasn't until driving from Fairbanks to Denali National Park that we were treated to full exposure views of Mount McKinley for about forty-five minutes. Our two days in Barrow were astounding. Temperatures climbed into the high forties, and the sun was shining. Our hummer trip to Point Barrow did not produce Polar Bears, but we sure had a fun time looking. Red Phaloropes were maybe the most common species; what a great bird to watch just along side the road with displaying Pectoral and Semi-palmated Sandpipers. Gas Well Road and the road to Freshwater Lake yielded about twenty Steller's Eiders, two pairs of Spectacled Eiders, three male King Eiders, and two Sabine's Gulls. However, it was difficult to concentrate on the eiders with about twelve Snowy Owls around us, one on a nest, and another catching and eating rodents nearby. The many Pomarine Jaegers, Lapland Longspurs, and Snow Buntings also proved a minor distraction. At one point, half our group decided to visit the Native Cultural Center, which s^^^___ The Spoonbill August 1999, Vol. 48, No. 6 had a nice bird display, and to watch a very nice program on the culture of Barrow's natives. They even participated in a blanket toss! The Denali, Richardson, and Glenn Highways were very scenic, yielding looks at more ofthe same birds as well as a study of both Trumpeter and Tundra Swan, a pair of Pacific Loons on a nest, a Bald Eagle feeding young at a nest, Surf and White-winged Scoter, Oldsquaw, and White-winged Crossbill. David Bradford is leading a similar tour to Alaska May 30, 2000 through June 19, 2000. To sign up or receive more information, please contact David soon at 281-855-2615. 1999 Houston Audubon Society Birdathon John Edwards The 1999 Houston Audubon Society Birdathon is here! The Birdathon is a fun way to support the Houston Audubon Land Acquisition Endowment. This fund will be used exclusively for the acquisition of habitat. The concept is simple: • First: Form a team of two to five birders, regardless of birding experience. • Second: Ask/beg/plead for friends, relatives, coworkers and businesses to contribute to your team's efforts by pledging a certain amount per species or a single lump sum donation. • Third: Bird anyplace you and your team can get to in the state of Texas on either October 2 or 3, 1999. Awards will be given at the Houston Audubon Society October membership meeting for the most species seen, best bird, most money raised, and most warblers. To receive a copy ofthe Birdathon Rules, call Audubon volunteer, Liz Dear-Zivley, 281-997-3711 or the Audubon office 713-932-1639. October Meeting Preview: Alaska Birds by David Bradford November Meeting Preview: The Red-cockaded Woodpecker: Natural History and Biology of an Endangered Species by Cliff Shackelford More about these presentations and speakers in September! Page 3