Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960
Image 9
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960 - Image 9. January 1960. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4462/show/4460.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1960). The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960 - Image 9. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4462/show/4460

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960 - Image 9, January 1960, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4462/show/4460.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. VIII, No. 9, January 1960
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1960
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9845
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f013_001_009.jpg
Transcript page 9 PAINTED BUNTING - one, latest fall record, November 15, 1948. SLATE-COLORED JUNCO - 2, earliest fall record: November 4, 1945* The presence of the juncos and the golden-crowned kinglets (4 were seen) both of which are unusual for the island suggests that the force and speed of the cold front carried these migrants past their normal wintering range since neither speoies winters on the island or commonly to the southwest of it. The 22 GROOVE- BILLED ANIS, all flushed from one salt cedar is a record high count for our area, the previous one being about 6. The BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER'S presence may probably he accounted for by the force and speed of the northwest cold front which must have swept thie bird eastward. By November 10th most of the warblers had left and by November 15 the bulk of the migrants had moved on as indicated by the observations listed in the December Spoonbill for those dates. But unlike the case at Midland the cold fronts didn't sweep away all of our migrants. Arriving at the gulf some migrants stop and linger, some even winter. Some of these were noted on the T. 0. S. field trip to Galveston and some on the Freeport and Houston counts. This was a good year for lingerers in our area perhaps because we haven't had any prolonged severe cold weather(but we usually don't before January or February if then) or perhaps because severe cold eeather in the area north of us forced birds that would have lingered south to our area. Or maybe it was just that we had more observers in the field. The last argument is supported by the fact that Hr. McKay found very few lingerers at Cove, an area that has received consistent good coverage for many years. Many unusual birds were seen at Galveston during the T. 0. S. Field trip there. Cut- standing was of course the BLACK PHOEBE, the PURPLE GALLINULE seen at Sheldon is the third winter reoord for our area. Previous ones were December 1, 1933* Galveston and January 12, 1939. Houston. The AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS were the latest ever seen in our area, the previous latest fall record: November 20, 1948, Galveston. These birds may winter in West Bay ' and thus escape detection by land bound birders. The BALTIMORE ORIOLE was the fourth record in winter for this area. The SAGE THRASHER McKay saw on November 22 was the fifth winter record for the area. Several things about the winter season could be predicted from November observations, such as the following: as mentioned previously, lingerers would be more numerous than usual. The early severe cold on the Great Plain* drove northern birds into our area. Cedar waxwings came early being seen at Cove on November 19th and at LaPorte on BoVember 20th. Robins would have a good year. They came early and in large numbers. Mr. McKay got his first on November 17th with 1,000 plus in two flocks. Golden-crowned kinglets would be present in numbers far above normal. 71ickers would be present in numbers far below par. Myrtle warblers would be present in numbers slightly below par. They were late in arriving in good numbers. The month of December has borne out these predictions and has added more information from which we can interpret the character of this winter. Submitted by Victor L. Emanuel BIBDIN6 IN THE BAYSHORE AREA — submitted by Linda Snyder December 6: Slate colored junco with goldfinches. To Galveston for the usual including shoveler, baldpate, blue and green-winged teal, redhead, scaup and ruddy ducks, common loon, cattle egret, American bittern, sora rail, Bonaparte's gull, KNOT, Inca dove, PALM WARBLER , BLACK PHOEBE, and vermillion flycatcher. December 7: 6 Bonaparte's gull, common loon, long-billed curlew. December 8: YELLOW-BHROATED WARBLER. December 17: CATBIRD, solitary vireo, Bonaparte's gull, eared grebe. December 191 scouting with Clint - 10 rusty blackbird, WHlTE-EYED VIREO, cedar waxwing, etc., avocet, ruddy duck, scaup, spotted sandpiper. December 20: rufous-sided towhee, yellowthroat, avocet, semi-palmated plover. December 21: WILSON'S WARBLER, yellowthroat, purple finch. December 26: scouting again - CATBIRD, yellowthroat, purple finch, plus golden-crowned and ruby-crowned kinglets, cedar waxwings, goldfinch, robin, myrtle and orange-crowned warblers, 2 solitary vireos, 32 avocet, spotted sandpiper, sanderling, ecaup, shoveler, pintail (500), 4 green-winged teal. December 30: red-breasted nuthatch near Morgan's Point, but did find my woodcock again. December 31: Bonaparte's gull, gull-billed tern, black skimmer, spotted sandpiper. January 3: GREEN-TAILED TOWHEE at Strang Road corner. January 4: WHITE-TAILED HAWK at Battle grounds. January 5* 10 Bonaparte's gull, woodcock, yellow-crowned night heron. Finished the year with a list of 276 species for the area. ♦♦Addendum - January 6 - Just found a. *CATTLE EGRET^ at the Baytown tunnel. Apologies from your editor - our thanks to everyone who sent in material this month but, as you can see, we are stuffed with Christmas Count and couldn't include it in this issue. Bear with us, and keep that good old stuff coming in. Thank you.