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The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960 - Image 8. January 1960. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4462/show/4459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1960). The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960 - Image 8. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4462/show/4459

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960 - Image 8, January 1960, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4462/show/4459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 9, January 1960
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. VIII, No. 9, January 1960
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1960
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9845
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f013_001_008.jpg
Transcript page 8 and cattails and surrounded for the most part with fairly dense oak woods. I would like to take this importunity to thank Hr. McDonald, Mr. Molar, and Mr. Davis. Mr. Davis gave us permission to cover the Angleton Cun Club area. I would also like to thank the Wrights for helping us with the count again this year and for letting us meet at their house after the count to tally up. Since they were uncertain as to whether they could be in town for the count I didn't assign them an area, so on the day of the count they visited various areas and their totals for birds, not seen by area members In the respective areas are added in to the total count. Thc number of individuals seen on the count was accelerated at an even faster rate than the number of species. In 1957, 5,084 birds were seen. In 1958, 13,853 - and this year! 37.871. A number of fairly common to uncommon birds were missed on this years count as usual. These included! common loon, red-breasted merganser, American goldeneye, white cuowned, seaside and LeConte's sparrows, caracara, mottled duck, eared grebe, piping plover, slate-colored junco, screech owl. Birds seen last year but not tikis year included! rough-legged hawk, green heron, bald eagle, Henslow's sparrow, dickcissel, indigo bunting, piping plover, common loon rusty blackbird and ruddy turnstone. The sky was overcast in the morning but at 8:10 a.m. a cold front hit. From then until 9:30 a.m. it rained, but shortly thereafter the rain abated and by noon the sky was clear. However the gulf was rough and this may explain our failure to get some of the birds listed above such as red-breasted merganser, eared grebe, piping plover and common loon. We still need more observers and more parties. All areas suffered from Insufficient coverage. Nevertheless the total was very good and should rank as one of the top counts in the United States. Next year with more parties I am confident we can break 150. IMtQtiMH * iMOtiOMM * .ttltltilt COMMENTS ON NOVEMBER OBSERVATIONS OF BIRDS AS SHOWN IN CLEARING HOUSE—by Viator L. Emanuel This years November observations were so unusual that it will be hard for me to do them justice in an article of reasonable length. Normally November is the month in which the last trickle <f the fall migration which began way back in July is observed. Also the winter residents arrive and the pattern and the character of the coming winter season can be discerned. But this November the migration observed was not a trickle but a wave and a huge one considering the time of the year. The best place to study migration in our area is Galveston. Fortunately observations were made at Galveston on November 7th, Sth, 10th, 15th and of course during the T. 0. S. Field Trip to Galveston November 27-29th. The birds seen by observers on these dates are listed in the December Spoonbill, but before going into these observations I would like to consider the November weather and reports from an area north of ours. The following is a quotation from The Phalarope, the excellent newsletter of the Midland Naturalists (Midnats) of Midland, Texas! "Winter cold, with snow arrived six weeks early in Colorado and northern New Mexico. This cold was unusually severe for so early In the season. Possibly this may account for our influx of western species. Similar early cold in the northern plains may have hastened the departure of fall migrants there, and caused the rapid build-up in our area. When the first cold wave arrived at Midland, it was the coldest November 5th on record, and a second cold wave on the heels of the first was just as severe. This sudden severe winter weather, instead of our usual long, mild fall possibly shoved the mass of fall migrants southward, leaving only our winter residents." The weather in our a- rea was similar to that in Midland since the same Pacific northwest cold fronts that sweep over Colorado, New Mexico and Midland usually reach our area. But by the time they get to the Gulf their intensity is lessened. During November a series offast moving strong cold fronts swept over the state. The first big one, which hit Midland on November 5th, hit our area around November 6th and judging from the concentration of migrants observed on Galveston on November Sth, this sold front did shove the migrants which were concentrated on the south plains south to the Gulf. A number of migrants were present on Galveston on November 7th as shown by Feltner's and Beaver's observations. But more must have come in during the night to have resulted in the concentrations observed by the same two observers plus Mrs. Snyder, Clinton Snyder and me. While looking for the black phoebe (which Feltner and Deaver had found on November 7th In the same place at which it was seen last winter from October to February) we discovered that the salt cedars were teeming with migrants. Our complete list for this remarkable day was given in the December Spoonbill, but the following records are especially noteworthy! Seen on November Sth at Galveston; WOOD PEWEE - and one calling at dusk at Kempner Park, latest previous fall record! November 5« 194l. It is interesting that Hr. McKay found one at Cove on November 7th of this fall. BLUE-WINGED WARBLER! four in the salt cedars, this is surprising since this species is considered to be an early fall migrant with latest previous fall record: October 4, 1942. YELLOW WARBLER: one in the salt cedars latest fall record! November 10, 194l. PARULA WARBLER! one in the salt cedars, latest fall record: November 12, ig4s. WAGNOLIA WARBLER: 3 in the salt cedars, latest fall record, November 16, ig44. BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER - 12, a high count for so late, latest Pall record, November 30, ig4l. BLUE GROSBEAK - one, latest previous fall record! October 16.