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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
Image 6
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 6. July 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 8, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/436.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/436

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 6, July 1979, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 8, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/436.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 3, July 1979
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9864
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f004_007_006.jpg
Transcript Page 6 Park - products of a record 19 nests, according to a TP&W newsletter of 6/27/79. In addition, there are 12 more young cranes which were hatched this spring in a unique foster-parent program. Biologists took half the available eggs from the Woods Buffalo nests and placed them In sandhill crane nests at Grays Lake NWR In Idaho as part of a foster parent program started in 1975. Audubon Society biologist David Blanken- ship said that since whooping cranes in the wild normally only raise one offspring, even if there is an additional egg in the nest, young from the transplanted eggs are considered a bonus. The sandhill crane experiment alms not only to boost overall whooping crane numbers, but to establish a separate flock with the same migration route as the sandhills'. —Ed.!] REPORT FROM RANCHO DEL CIELO by Fred Webster The June tours to Rancho del Clelo, always popular, were made sven more enjoyable by an early start of the wet season. The forest was August-green In early June; guests were treated to the rumble of thunder In the mountains and the roar of rain on tin roofs—an experience usually reserved for later In the season. The. station received about 20 Inches In 10 days, mostly In overnight thundershowers. Many breeding bird species were feeding young In or out of the nes+. A Brown-backed Soli+aire established Its home In a clump of orchids which the s+aff had attached to the rock facing of the dining hall. Guests came and went below the nest without alarming the bird, but a blast from the dinner horn Invariably put It to flight. A wedge-tailed Sabrewlng (hummingbird) had a nest on a clothes line under the porch roof, built over two clo+hes pins. Human-traffic was tolerated here also. Another nest of this species was found In a nearby cave. 1+ ts no+ unusual for Wedge-+ails +o build on roots at the mouth of a cave, sheltered by the overhang. After constructing a rather large nest, the bird decorates 1+ wi+h a few strings of moss which dangle, several Inches from the nest. The name Rancho del Clelo may be misleading to folks who have a preconceived Image of what constitutes a ranch. Our "ranch" Is merely a small acreage within the oak- sweet gum cloud forest of southwestern Tamaullpas, Mexico, and Is maintained as a biological station by Texas Southmost College. The clearing Is only large enough to accommodate a small orchard, flower and vegetable gardens, and a few buildings. The facility was built among towering trees at the forest edge, so that even avian Inhabitants of the deepest shade can often be seen from one's doorstep—I.e., mot- mo+s, nightingale thrushes, Blue Mockingbirds, and even (If you're lucky) tlnamous and Singing Quail. Birds of the canopy and more open situations, such as Least Pygmy Owls, Mountain Trogons, woodcreepers, Gray-collared Becards, Hooded Grosbeaks, and many others are resident on or regular visitors to the "campus". The orchard and gardens are especially attractive to Red-billed Azurecrowns, Melodious Blackbirds, White-collared Seedeaters, Black-headed Siskins, Etc. With a number of birders dally walking the forest trails, little goes unnoticed. Our surprises Included a nest-bulIding pair of Yellow-winged Tanagers, very rare In the cloud forest. Plumbeous Kites had a nest In the usual area and were feeding at least one young. Welcome visitors Included several Bumble-bee Hummingbirds, which we thought should be nesting at higher elevations by this time, and a Crane Hawk. Not to mention a pair of Hooded Yellowthroats, never before recorded in the cloud forest, which must have been headed for breeding grounds on the back (dry) side of the mountain. Our all-day trips to the mountain top (one each +our) were +o Casa Ptedras, a beautiful cliff-walled valley where waterfalls tumble down from the peaks, and to a pine- forested mountain valley, with waterfalls and springs, called Agua Linda. ! Here we found a pair of Black Robins, spo++ed first by John Arvin, apparently only for the third sighting for the region. UTC area participants in June Rancho Del Cielo tours were: Larry and Martha Ballard, Lake Jackson; Glenn and Wesley Cureton, Ms. Margaret E. Anderson, Dennis Casserly, Mrs. Sam S. Griffin, and Miss Robin Wood, all of Houston; Austin Evans, Lake Jackson. PLACES TO GO We In the Houston area have to drive so far to get to our usual birding haunts. It is getting perplexing to think of places to suggest that wouldn't burn up too much gas. We really need some suggestions from you readers In Houston for nearby places to go. Bear Creek Park, Mercury Drive, Sheldon Reservoir, Deussen Park are several that come to mind, with Galveston and Bolivar Flats beckoning if you've a full tank of gas. If you do get over to Sea Rim State Park, take advantage of the air-boat rides. TP&W newsletter tells us that there Is now a concession there providing tours seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. at $5.00 per adult, $3.00 for children 5 +o 12, under five children are free. There is also a 3/4-mlle boardwalk trail.