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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 5. July 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/435.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/435

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 5, July 1979, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/435.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 3, July 1979
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9864
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f004_007_005.jpg
Transcript Page 5 s+an+lally Increased size. 1+ is s+ill one of the best bargains In birding publications we know. Jon is sugar-coating the increased rate by offering a 50? discount on the purchase of A Guide to North American Bird Clubs, as long as the supply lasts, for all renewals and new subscriptions to Birding News Survey. For $7.50, this is a bargain, and Jon will cheerfully practice his penmanship should you desire it uto- graphed! Send your checks to Avian Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 310, ElIzabethtown, Kentucky 42701, Including $6.00 for the subscription and $7.50 for the book. ** Tony Gallucci sends word via Ted Eubanks, Jr. that the Mountain Plover at Fort Davis hatched 3 chicks and has moved them away from the nesting area. ** Tess Barry, an 0G member from Beaumont, was moving In exalted birding circles in May she took a boat trip to the Dry Tor+ugas, wl+h 6 leaders aboard: Will & Maude Russel, Rich Stallcup, Rich Rowle+te, Jon Dunn and Davis Finch! She says it was quite an experience, and lots of fun. James Vardaman, trying for that 700 birds this year, met the group at Ft. Jefferson and birded with Will Russell while there. ** A SPOONBILL subscriber from Indianapolis, Larry Peavler, was mentioned in a recent newsletter from Vardaman as being a member of his Alaska 9-man par+y. After reading about this Alaska trip, one word comes to mind: STRENUOUS! By the end of this year of striving to reach that magical number of 700, James Vardaman Is liable +o consider a dead run just a pleasant stroll! TRACKING SANDHILL CRANES from Natural History Survey, March 1979 In cooperation with the University'of Wisconsin and the U.S.Fish and Wildlife Service Survey wildlife biologists William W. Cockran and Arlo Raim studied the fall migration of sandhill cranes from the Interlake region nor+h of Winnepeg, Manitoba, where these birds breed, to their wintering grounds on the Texas coast. Raim devised two radio transmitter designs for mounting on the leg band normally used by wildlife researchers for marking this species. One of the designs was conventional, being powered by batteries for a predicted life of I year. The other used photocells to provide an Indefinite period of operation. A total of 12 transmitters was constructed. The Canadian Wildlife Service placed the transmitters on nestlings in late July. Personnel from the University of Wisconsin and the Canadian Wildlife Service monitored the birds as they dispersed from their breeding area to southern Manitoba and North Dakota, where they spent the last part of August and all of September. Cockran went to North Dakota in early October, prior to the migration of the sandhill cranes, to instruct personnel from the University of Wisconsin In the techniques used for following migrants. One bird, in a flock of about 500, was followed to a wintering area for the species southwest of Houston, Toxas. These birds turned out to be easy to follow because they travel slowly and make their migratory flights during the same period each day (from 1100 to 1730 hours). Cockran's interest was in the possibility for observing the homing phase of this migration during which the birds were expected to alter their generally southward course to seek out their specific wintering areas. It was expected that a rather abrupt change would be noted about the time the birds reached the latitude of their goal. The cranes' flight was almost due south for the first 800 miles (this took 4 days) after which the flight distance covered per day was reduced to about 80 miles and tht flight direction became rather unpredictable. Flight was generally to the southeast, south, or southwest, seemingly dependent upon wind direction. However, during the last half hour to hour of flight each day, the direction shifted to almost straight east or west. During this period, the flock size (the number of birds with the radlc equipped bird) was reduced gradually to about 200 birds and, finally +o about 70 birds. These observations suggest that experienced members of the flock search out familiar landmarks during the latter portion of the migration, with flock breakup due to differing goals. If this Is the case, this species Is a poor one for definitive studies of orientation and navigation mechanisms. The principal objectives of the study were to evaluate habitat use during migration and to field test the technique and train personnel for a follow-up study of the endangered whooping crane In 1979-80. The study wt11 be continued with the spring migration of the sandhill cranes already radio tagged (and later, the whooping cranes) by researchers from the University of Wisconsin. (Natural History Survey is a division of the Illinois Institute of Natural Resources). LThere may be a record number of whooping cranes for the researchers to track this next winter, for at least 14 young whoopers have been seen at Woods Buffalo National