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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 4. July 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 8, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/434.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/434

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 4, July 1979, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 8, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/434.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 3, July 1979
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9864
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f004_007_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4 A JOYFUL REUNION by Margaret Jones THE SPOONBILL staff spent nearly a week in southern Ohio In June, visiting long-time friends they had not actually seen in 35 years....what a feast for eyes and tongues! Bill and Velma Collins live In a farmhouse, the main part of which Is 125 years old, In the middle of 2 wooded acres which are surrounded by fields of wheat, soybeans, etc. Bill, not a farmer, but a well-known horticulturist. Introduced us to a number of trees previously unknown to us, and we delighted In eating asparagus, spinach, etc. from his small garden. Imagine....asparagus just minutes from being picked to being eaten! Velma sent a subscriber's report on the effects of the cold winters of 1977-8 and 1978-9 on "her" birds to the March, 1978 and February, 1979 Issues of THE SPOONBILL. Just a few miles from the Collins' home Is a Christmas Bird Count area which fs worked by members of the Wheaton Club of Columbus, Ohio, of which Bt11 Is a member. The 1978 count recorded 63 species, registering several for the first time, but some "lows" were also noted: for the first time In the nine years of the count, no bob- white was found, only I Carolina Wren (average 52), no mockingbird as compared with an average of 18, and only 2 rlngnecked pheasants (average 35). Lowest ever totals were recorded for horned larks, starling, house sparrow, tree sparrow (33, with an average of 357), and field sparrows. However, swamp sparrows registered an amazing total of 48, an all-time high. Edward Thomas, who has written a newspaper Nature column for over 50 years, says the low numbers may be attributed to two fac+ors. First, the bitter weather of the two winters unquestionably was responsible for the loss of many birds, and second, the high wind also may have kept numerous birds under cover. Mr. Thomas referred to the temperature of the count day as "mild".... 32 to 38 degrees! But the wind gusted up to 34 mph, "conditions favorable neither for man nor bird". We saw for ourselves some of those effects of severe winters: complete lack of Carolina Wrens, titmice and chickadees, formerly plentiful at Tall Trees Farm; no bob- whites were seen or heard, but we were told they are slowly returning. Early each morning we heard Song Sparrows joyfully sounding off from some fence posts, a welcome sight and sound to the Collins, for after the blizzard snows of +wo wln+ers ago had melted, they found many of these songsters frozen, huddled In the grass. Ano+her welcome sound to our friends was the chatter of a chickadee which we heard while In a National Forest not far from their home, the first they had heard in many, many months. While In this forest we had a blissfully close view of four Louisiana Waterthrushes, cavorting in a nearly dry dam overflow culvert, wandering with their bobblng-rumped walk, picking in the damp spots, flitting a few fee+, +hen resuming their walking and picking. So....just picture us on our vacation If you will, sitting in the cool shade (mornings in the 50's), and hearing no neighbor's voice, no street traffic, no planes overhead, breathing non-stagnant, unpolluted air, and drinking cool well water minus chlorine. We learned what an indefatigable singer the House Wren is, and marveled at the loud song coming from that tiny body; while picking raspberries (quarts every day!) onemornlng In one of the tangled islands of shrubs and vines deliberately lef+ for +he birds and small animals, we looked up jus+ a few fee+ overhead +o see a very young ca+blrd perched mo+lonless while Mama Ca+bird scolded nervously nearby. The Whi+e-breas+ed Nu+ha+ch's "yank, yank" could be heard, and he would appear when the feeder was filled wl+h en+lclng sun-flower seeds. The most satisfying sight of all, though, was one we saw at some time every day? the Downy, Hairy, and Red-headed woodpeckers all on the same tree trunk at the same time, taking turns at the suet hanging in a mesh bag on the trunk. The Red-headed, in particular, was very fond of the suet, and seemingly never strayed very far from that tree. This was birding at its best leisurely contemplation,with good friends, of the birds around you, no concern for a list or a lifer, no wearying treks for miles to "add a few more birds for the day", with time to sit, listen, and savor....this was truly "Joy unconflned"! AROUND AND ABOUT ** Anne Speers' article "Try a Hummingbird Cafeteria", in THE SPOONBILL, October, 1978, Is reprinted in the Summer Issue of Birding News Survey. We are pleased that Jon Rlckert deemed it as enjoyable and informative as we did. Anne tells us that she recently saw many Least Terns nesting at the Ski Basin In Rockport, with lots of blue tags visible. Bruce Thompson SSvIousIy been busy down there. Remember, If you see any tagged Least Terns, send the Information per instructions in the May, 1979 SPOONBILL to Bruce. rid- • ** Jon Rlckert has been forced to Increase the subscription rate to that excellent quarterly, Birding News Survey to $6.00,-caused by rising production costs and sub-