Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
Image 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 3. July 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/433.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/433

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 3, July 1979, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/433.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 3, July 1979
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9864
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f004_007_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3 a bibliographic rart+y) accumulated a simply enormous amount of factual material about the migrations, distribution, concentrations, breeding, response to weather and climate, casual occurrences, and general status of hundreds of species along the entire Texas coastal area. I wish there were space here to list the names of the dozens of people who contributed faithfully to the publication over many years. But I must mention two who are now dead, and whose contributions were outstanding: the late famous "bird woman" of Rockport—Connie Hagar; and the late Arlle McKay of Cove, Texas, near the mouth of the Trinity River. The material that was complied In The. Gulf Coast Migrant has been used by professional ornithologists ever since—including Roger Tory Peterson in his Field Guide to the Birds of Texas and Harry C. Oberholser In his monumental Birds of Texas; and It was the source from which Stephen G. Williams compiled his Checklist of Birds of the Upper Texas Coast (published In 1962 by the Ornithology Group and long out of print). Since The Gulf Coast Migrant ceased publication In 1951, the Ornithology Group has added much new knowledge to what was then known about birds of the Texas coast, and The Spoonbl11 has made this knowledge available to all. But The Gulf Coast Migrant's accumulation of fifteen years of specific facts about birds of the Texas coast was a pioneering achievement as well as a consistent and (within Its scope) thorough Job In a field that had previously been covered only spot+lly and by guess-work. I believe it was the very first ornithological journal ever published In Texas. Fortunately, it has been (as Edgar Klnkald said In notes on Oberholser's Birds of Texas) "largely replaced" by The Spoonbl11, the first Issue of which appeared In July, 1952, six months after the last Gulf Coast Migrant. In many ways, however, the accumulation of accurate information about bird species on the Texas coast was less significant than some other results effected by the publication. Among these results were the following: (I) For the first time the enorm ous wealth of bird life on the Texas coast In spring, autumn, and winter was reveale (2) For the first time the Texas coast became universally recognized as one of the major migration areas (If not the major migration area) of North America. (3) For the first time the direct and specific influences of wind and weather on migrations was fully demonstrated. (4) For the first time the regular occurrence In winter in the Gulf coastal region of scattered Individuals of many western species was demonstrated. (5) As a result of all these revelations, Audubon Field-Notes (now American Birds) began running a regular column (now edited by Fred Webster) on the SouTh Texas region. (6) For the first time the ornithologists of the Texas coast, especially those of the Houston-Galveston region, became a group who knew one another, cooperated with one another in ornithological activities and research, kept records, and shared one another's knowledge and discoveries. Perhaps this is the most valuable of the results that the old Gulf Coast Migrant helped to produce. [We are deeply Indebted to George Williams for delineating our birding Information "roots". Unfortunately, there are few OG members who have seen any copies of The Gulf Coast Migrant, and even more unfortunately, the OG Library has no copies on its shelves. The Fondren Library of Rice University has a complete set, and anyone whD Is Interested can read them there. —Ed.] A NEW GUIDE BOOK OF INTEREST Ronald G. Bisbee, Refuge Manager of Brazoria & San Bernard NWRs, has sent us news of the publication of a Guide to the National Wildlife Refuges by Laura and William Riley, published by Anchor Press/Doubleday. This is a guide to America's almost 400 national witdlife refuges. It tells where they are located, how to get there, what to see and do, where to camp or stay, the best time to visit, how to dress, and what equipment to take. Also Included tn the book are birding highlights for every reglo of the country. U.S. national wildlife refuges, which were begun as a national project when Presldenr Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed tiny Pelican Island as a wild bird sanctuary In 1903, now cover more than 30 million acres In almost every state. Including Alaska and Hawaii. They harbor wtldllfe called by President Russell Train of the World Wildlife Fund - U.S. "as diverse and Interesting as that of any country In the world"—an extraordinary array of more than 220 species of mammals, more than 600 of birds, 250 of reptiles and amphibians, over 200 species of fish and uncounted numbers of plants, from wild orchids to unique kinds of palm trees. This first comprehensive guide ever published to these refuges says of Brazoria an<? San Bernard NWRs: "These relatively new refuges along the Texas Gulf Coast offer w d and roadless habitat for large numbers of ducks, geese and waders along with rails and other marsh types and Interesting small birds.....Brazoria Is part of the annual Audubon Christmas Count which centers in nearby Freeport and which often Is highest ;n the nation In the number of species seen". Access, It points out, Is limited, however, and by permission only through the refuge office.