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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 2. July 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 8, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/432.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/432

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979 - Image 2, July 1979, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 8, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/445/show/432.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 3, July 1979
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 3, July 1979
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9864
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f004_007_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 Red Knot, Semlpalmated and Western Sandpipers, and Marbled Godwlt. The census of the Flats Is an on-going project, and cooperation and assistance from additional observers Is desired and encouraged. (See THE SPOONBILL, June, 1979, page 6) Fred Collins noted that the Flsh-eatlng Bird Survey for 1979 appeared to be quite successful, with a large majority of the recognized rookeries and colonies being covered this year. The Blue List, published yearly by the National Audubon Socle+y In American Birds, was the nex+ topic of the evening's discussion. The group decided to postpone an In-depth look at the list until the next meeting, when a Blue List submission to American Birds wl11 be compiled reflecting the combined opinions of the group. It was announced that on July 21, 1979, the BRG will conduct the first of Its monthly pelagic trips out of Galveston. Those Interested should contact Colin Summer- hayes for further information. Next, Bruce Thompson of the Welder Wildlife Foundation presented a program on his research on the Least Tern In Texas. (See THE SPOONBILL, May, 1979, page 2). Thompson, who Is studying the colony site characteristics and population status of the Least Tern on the Texas Gulf Coast, is marking Individual Least Terns with pataglum bands for easy and definitive field identification. Later this summer Thompson will select a single day on which the Least Terns will be censused on the Texas Gulf Coast. THE SPOONBILL will be notified of this date for publication. THE STORY OF THE I'GULF COAST MIGRANT" by George Williams, Rice University In the early I930's almost no consistent and continuing work had been done on the ornithology of the Texas coast; and very little about the subject had been published. Most of the available da+a on the area had been assembled by Northern and Eastern ornithologists who had made brief visits to the region (usually centering their work about the Rio Grande Valley), or who had received specimens from collectors on the coast. Even the resident observers (such as A+twa+er, J.J. Carroll, and R.A. Selle) either did not keep regular records, or published rarely. The result was that the Texas coastal area, from the Gulf Itself to 50-60 miles inland, was not generally regarded by ornithologists as especially significant. As late as 1924 the famous Wells W. Cooke, who did so much pioneering work on the distribution and migrations of American birds, wrote that migrants, by shunning the Texas coast, "seek In this^ way to avoid a region scantily supplied with moist woodlands." And even A.C. Bent s Life Histories appearing in the I920's and the early I930's do not halfway reflect the facts about the Texas coast that we now know +o be true. Before the I930's it was believed +ha+ the great migration routes of birds wintering south of the United States lay back and forth along the Florida peninsula, or across the Gulf of Mexico. It was assumed that Texas (especially eastern Texas) caught only the spillover from the main routes. In 1930 I became Interested, more or less theoretically. In the origins and causes of bird migration. But since I knew little about field observation, or about our local birds, I looked for someone who could teach me. I discovered him in Joseph M. Helser, Jr., a founder of the Houston Outdoor Nature Club, from whom I have learned everything I ever knew about birding In the field. From about 1932 he and I, along with any other enthusiasts who would accompany us, began making regular field trips in the Houston-Galveston area. Within a year or two we had acquired a weal+h of information about Texas coastal birds that was in none of the books. Consider, for example, only the Sandpiper family, and published "facts" about It In 1930: that the Dowitcher was not known north of Corpus Christl; the Stilt Sandpiper was not known on the Texas coast; the Whlte-rumped Sandpiper was a common winter resident on the Texas coast; the Knot had been recorded only in Corpus Christ!; the Western Sandpiper appeared on the Texas coast as only a rare winter resident near the mouth of the Rio Grande; the Sanderling was only a spring migrant on the coast; the Hud- sonlan Curlew was rare or absent on the Texas coast. Similar misinformation about most other bird families was current In many published ornithological sources. It soon became apparent that, if we were to get at the truth about birds on the Texas coast, we needed information from all along the coast. Accordingly, I rooted out names of "bird-watchers" scattered along the coast from Brownsville Into Louisiana, and asked them If they would pool their observations with me, and let me correlate and compile all the data periodically, and then mall out the compilation to all the cooperating reporters. The response was enthusiastic: birders of the Texas coast seemed to have been waiting for just such an opportunity. The Gulf Coast Migrant came Into being. It was a mimeographed publication that was Issued at regular Intervals for the next fifteen years—February 1936 to December-1951.' Its 66 numbers (which have now become