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The Spoonbill, June - July 2001
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The Spoonbill, June - July 2001 - Image 5. June 2001 - July 2001. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4444/show/4440.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 2001 - July 2001). The Spoonbill, June - July 2001 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4444/show/4440

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, June - July 2001 - Image 5, June 2001 - July 2001, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4444/show/4440.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, June - July 2001
Contributor (Local)
  • Haddican, Mary Pat
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 2001 - July 2001
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9886
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f005_006_005.jpg
Transcript i mated Sandpipers have bills that are fairly tapered with somewhat sharply pointed tips. Western Sandpipers have bills that are long, tapered, and droop at the tip. A bird that has a bill fitting this size and shape is almost certainly a Western Sandpiper. Many Western Sandpipers have bills that are fairly tapered with somewhat sharply pointed tips. Notice that this sentence is exactly the same as a sentence above about the Semipalmated Sandpiper. That merely says that you cannot always use bill shape to separate these two species. An ornithologist by the name of Allan Phillips, in the mid 1970s, burst a birding bubble when he pointed out that nearly all ofthe hundreds of winter records of Semipalmated Sandpipers reported in North America were misiden- tifications. Most were Westerns. A Semipalmated Sandpiper in winter in North America is quite unusual. The name Semipalmated itself is a bit of a misnomer as it refers to a partially palmed (webbed) foot. This Sandpiper does have some trivial webbing between the toes so the name does not incorrectly describe the bird. But, unfortunately, most other peeps, including the Western Sandpiper, have the same webbing. Because ofthe name, many inexperienced birders think they can use the existence of this webbing to make an identification. That's not correct and even if the webbing was a good ID clue, it is very difficult to see. A bird with a muddy foot might well look webbed even with no webbing at all. Summer birding can be great fun and it does have some of its own special challenges. The term "confusing fell warblers" was coined by Roger Tory Peterson. It labeled the top of a whole page of fell warblers that all look alike. Many adult warblers leave the north as soon as the young can fend for themselves. They are on the move as early as late July, while the young don't move until September and October. Those early adults look much like they did in the spring. While most ofthe young have molted from juvenal to first winter plumage, they are still not like adults. That, however, is the subject of another article. Don is a regular writer and lecturer about birds and teaches a beginning birding field course in conjunction with the Houston Audubon Society. Contact him at (281) 997-0485 or cdplace@concentric.net Web Cam Update Falcon Fledglings Learn to Fly and Hunt M. P. Haddican i The falcon nest being watched by a world-wide audience on the internet is empty. All four eyases (baby falcons)— determined to be 3 females and 1 male during banding last month— left the nest in June, about 6 weeks after hatching from eggs laid in the nestbox on the Kodak Tower in Rochester, New York. In previous years when the young birds left the Kodak Tower nest, the bird- viewing audience was left to wonder and worry about their fate. This year, the e- birders of Rochester have organized a sunrise-to-sunset watch ofthe family's activities, with descriptions posted (under Discussion Boards) on the falcon webcam site. According to the viewers' descriptions, the juveniles have been watching the adult birds soar and dive overhead, and have gradually left the ledge under the nestbox on wings that beat rapidly and clumsily. While the adults continue to provide food for the four juveniles, the young birds are observed making stronger and surer attempts at catching prey during flight, and are becoming adept at receiving in-flight transfers of food. Go to Kodak.com and click on Bird- cam 2001 to continue to follow the life cycle ofthe falcons.