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The Spoonbill, June - July 2001
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The Spoonbill, June - July 2001 - Image 4. June 2001 - July 2001. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4444/show/4439.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 2001 - July 2001). The Spoonbill, June - July 2001 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4444/show/4439

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, June - July 2001 - Image 4, June 2001 - July 2001, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4444/show/4439.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, June - July 2001
Contributor (Local)
  • Haddican, Mary Pat
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 2001 - July 2001
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9886
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f005_006_004.jpg
Transcript Beginning Birding Summer Birding (Part 1) Don Richardson In some ways it doesn't surprise me when people do little birding in summer, and in other ways, it does. There is a lot going on in summer. Of course there are breeding birds, and in the marshes and woodlands there are lots of opportunities to sharpen skills in recognizing the songs of those birds. The marshlands abound with herons and egrets, moorhens and gallinules, and the ever so colorful Roseate Spoonbills. A visit to a rookery provides activity that is as busy as anything can be, along with bill, leg, and feather colors that are as bright and vibrant as one can imagine. The lores of a Great Egret are the color ofthe back of a Painted Bunting, while the bill of a Tricolored Heron is a rich cobalt blue with a sheen like mother-of-pearl. There's something else, though, and it's called migration. Shorebirds, in general, migrate earlier than other types of birds. Gulf Coast birds probably peak in August but there is a considerable amount of activity in July. Kenn Kaufman wrote a book in 1990 called Advanced Birding. In it, he discusses the identification of a couple of "peeps". (Peep is a collective name referring to about a dozen or more small sandpipers - mostly in the genus Calidris.) He deals with Western and Semipalmated Sandpipers, two ofthe six similar species of peeps found along die Gulf of Mexico. He points out that the two are very difficult to separate. In winter (basic) plumage, they are nearly impossible. There are some things about bill shape and darkness ofthe back and face that might help. There is also enough overlap in these things so that only individuals that are at the extremes ofthe variation can be positively identified. Kaufman points out that Western and Semipalmated Sandpipers are colored differently enough in breeding (alternate) plumage to be fairly easy to identify. Migrants that arrive on the Gulf Coast in July should still be wearing this plumage. As we move into August, this alternate plumage is either quite worn or has actually molted to basic plumage. By the end of August along the Gulf Coast, you can see endless banks of snow in the 90+ degree heat along the high water lines on the beaches. No, it's not snow, it's the millions of feathers that have molted from these migrating sandpipers. Other peeps you might see in summer are Least and Baird's Sandpiper. We see the White-rumped Sandpiper in spring, but they tend to use a different migration route in their return to South America. There are some fairly dependable field marks for identifying these peeps but they are not always easy to see. Least Sandpipers have yellow legs while the other four Gulf coast sandpipers have dark legs. Western and Semipalmated Sandpipers have a tail that is longer than their wing extension. (Standing on the ground, their tail extends beyond the wing tips). White- rumped and Baird's Sandpipers have wing tips that extend beyond the tail. Looking at all five: Yellow legs = Least Sandpiper. Long wings and a white rump = White-rumped Sandpiper. Long wings and a dark rump = Baird's Sandpiper. Shorter wings and dark legs = Western or Semipalmated Sandpiper You can see that those last two are going to be trouble. Now that we see that three of them are so "easy to separate", (I'm joking) we'll take a closer look at the difficult two. Please remember that all the marks I'm mentioning are variable. There is enough overlap in the marks so they cannot always completely identify the birds. The faces of Semipalmated Sandpipers generally have a little more contrast than Western. The cap is darker, the lores are darker, and the eyebrow is lighter. The Semipalmated Sandpiper's eyebrow may look narrower than on the Western Sandpiper, but that is because the Western Sandpiper's cap is lighter and provides less contrast. The lores on a Semipalmated Sandpiper seem as wide or wider than the eye while on a Western Sandpiper the lores are narrow like the front part of an eye line and seldom as wide as the eye. Bill shape may hold some clues. It is true that bill shapes are different. Semipalmated Sandpipers have bills that are short, tubular, straight and blunt. Some may even be a bit expanded or bulbous at the tip. That bulbous characteristic or even a very tubular and blunt bill is a good indication of a Semipalmated Sandpiper. Many Semipal- i