Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 56, No. 1, January 2007
Image 7
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 56, No. 1, January 2007 - Image 7. January 2007. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4419/show/4417.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 2007). The Spoonbill, Vol. 56, No. 1, January 2007 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4419/show/4417

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 56, No. 1, January 2007 - Image 7, January 2007, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4419/show/4417.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 56, No. 1, January 2007
Contributor (Local)
  • Shultz, Al
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 2007
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9891
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f015_001_007.jpg
Transcript programs ended in the 1990s, but commercial falcon breeding continues. Falconers now use large numbers of captive-bred falcons, some of which are interspecies hybrids not previously found in nature. Listers, beware: the possibility now exists that a large falcon seen in the wild may be an escaped exotic, even a non-species (Gyrfalcon x Peregrine)! Thousands of captive-bred Peregrines were released into the wild in the US and Canada in the 1980s and 1990s. Most of these were placed as downy nestlings into artificial nest boxes on cliffs or towers, or in the scattered remaining anatum nests in the West. However, breeding stock for this reintroduced population was derived from a blend of Peregrines from several subspecies, including many from other continents. (Most Atlantic and Gulf coastal migrants, however, are tundrius Arctic migrants just as before.) Although the USFWS refers to all breeding Peregrines in the former anatum range as anatum, and thereby claims an impressive 'recovery' for this subspecies, it has not so much recovered as it has been replaced. Initial indications are that wild Peregrine populations are healthy and are assimilating these new genes. And, politics and bloodlines aside, more falcons in the air are a happy sight. Still, pesticides and habitat loss remain critically serious problems, and many Peregrines continue to experience poor reproductive rates. Only time will tell how sustainable the recovery really is. -Al Shultz References: Enderson, J., 2005. Peregrine falcon: stories of the blue meanie. Univ. of Texas Press. Hickey, J. J.. 1969. Peregrine falcon populations: their biology and decline. Univ. of Wisconsin Press, Madison. Houle, M. C, 1991. Wings for my flight. Addison-Wesley, New York. Tordoff, H. B., P. T. Redig, 2001. The role of genetic background in reintroduced Peregrine Falcons. Conserv. Biol. 15: 528-532. US Fish & Wildlife Service, 2003. Monitoring Plan for the American Peregrine Falcon: a species recovered under the Endangered Species Act: library.fws.gov/Pubs 1 /peregrine03 .pdf CELEBRATE BOXING DAY BY RECYCLING (A message for the New Year, from Ella Tyler of the Citizens' Environmental Coalition) In British countries, the first weekday after Christmas day, generally December 26, is a public holiday called Boxing Day. When I was a child, we lived in a Crown Colony and I thought Boxing Day was the day you rewrapped gifts you didn't want and gave them to someone else. It seems to me that recycling fits right into the spirit of Boxing Day. There's plenty to recycle - the unwanted gifts, the towels that have been replaced with new ones, and the half-roll of wrapping paper you now hate. And it's a start on a New Year's resolution to be more green in 2007. If you are in doubt as to whether an item you don't want has a second (or ninth) life, check out the wish list for several local nonprofits. Places that have education programs for children appreciate simple items such as 2-liter bottles, buttons, egg cartons, fabric scraps, flat cardboard, meat trays, nature magazines, neckties, shoeboxes, and wrapping paper scraps. Shelters for people and pets need bedding, clothing, and personal care items. A newly formed Houston nonprofit, Techs & Trainers Incorporated, reuses old computers as training tools for special needs workers. The refurbished computers are then used to bring technology to people with disabilities. The group can be reached by calling (713) 839-7177 or sending a note to techs1234@yahoo.com. For the holiday season, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality updated its list of places to recycle electronics. The list can be found at: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/assets/public/assistance/P2Recycle/electronics/recyclers_nonprofits.pdf The City of Houston will provide Christmas tree recycling drop-off sites throughout Houston from Dec 27 to Jan 9. See http://www.houstontx.gov/solidwaste/christmastrees2005.html The city will also pick up trees from houses that have yard trimmings pick up. The Houston Westpark Recycling Center, 5900 Westpark, is close to a one-stop shop for recycling. It accepts Christmas trees and electronic waste as well as other recyclables. The Houston Galveston Area Council's recycling guide for our 13-county area is on-line at: http://www.h-gac.com/HGAC/Programs/Solid+Waste/2006+Recycle+Guide.htm