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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970
Image 7
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970 - Image 7. August 1970. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/44/show/42.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1970). The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/44/show/42

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970 - Image 7, August 1970, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/44/show/42.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIV, No. 4, August 1970
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date August 1970
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9855
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Note Incorrect volume number, XVIV, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f007_008_007.jpg
Transcript Page 7. ecosystem. Consequences of an ecocatastrophe may be felt immediately, or generations later. Many of the consequences are predictable, but not always. Scientists can't decide, for example, if the water vapor released into the upper atmosphere by jet airplanes will trap the heat from the sun causing a "greenhouse Effect" which will stifle us, or reflect the heat of the sun causing a drop in the average temperature. A drop of only four degrees in the average temperature brought on Ice Ages in times past. Whether the temperature drops or rises, the magnitude of the ecocatastrophe involved would probably mean the end of most forms of life on earth. Pollution There are many forms of pollution. It occurs in air, water or as noise. Pollution is the addition of substances into nature which have an adverse affect upon life. We are most concerned with air and water pollution since it is becoming apparent that these substances, quite necessary for the perpetuation of life on this planet, are rapidly being fouled beyond a usuable level and beyohd their capacity to purify themselves. Thermal Thermal pollution is pollution by heat. The most common source of Pollution thermal pollution is from generating plants which use water for codling machinery.Warm water may offer a variety of threats to aquatic life. Dissolved oxygen content is lower in warm water, and fish may die of oxygen starvation. Warm water encourages choking algae blooms and may act as a barrier to feeding and reproduction. Pesticides Perhaps the most serious and subtle form of pollution today is _rom chlorinated pesticides. Pesticides are chemicals used to kill pests, but the word "pesticide" is misleading, A more accurate term would be "biocides", that whieh kills life, because many of the pesticides used today are non-selective. For example, biologists believe that the DDT used in the Rio Grande Valley to control the cotton boll-weevil may be "controlling" speckled trout in the Lower Laguna Madre by limiting their reproduction. DDT can also be used to control crabs, shrimp and songbirds and is doing so now and may continue to do so long after even if its use is stopped. This is because DDT, and the rest of the chlorinated hydrocarbon biocides, are "persistent" whieh means that because they do not break down in non-toxic substances they will remain toxic for as many as 10 years. They are also "cumulative" in that an organism may store increasingly large quantities of the chemical as it is exposed to it. This accumulation is called "biological magnification," A hawk whieh eats three rabbits with the same amount of DDT in eaeh of their bodies ends up with three times as much DDT as one of the rabbits. Habitat Habitat is thetype of site which a plant or animal normally requires to live and grow. Biologists are concerned with the destruction of habitats since animals have adapted to a certain type of habitat for centuries and are ill-equiped for a sudden change. Destruction of habitat is both a problem on the land and in the water. On land wide areas are cleared for agriculture, subdividing, highway building and any other number of human activities occur without regard to wildlife. Channelization, dredging and filling of aquatic habitat virtually assures that the stream or river will produce few fish for generations to come. Estuary Perhaps the most important and most productive hab-tat are the estuaries- those shallow bays and marshes along the coast receiving fresh water from land drainage. Approximately 99 per cent of the species composing our commercial fish are dependent upon healthy estuaries for either a breeding place, a nursery for their young or production of their food. Killing or destroying the estuaries destroys most of the life in the ocean. Population At the root of our environmental problems is the rapid increase of popu- Explosion lation. Until this rate of increase is stopped, conservation efforts can have only limited success. Some population scientists estimate that the United States is already 50 million over the optimum level for the carrying capacity of the land. Our doubling rate, that is, the time that the population will double in size, is approximately 35 years. This means that our efforts to clean up pollution, to build hospitals, to provide schools and to provide the services needed to perpetuate our society will have to