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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970
Image 6
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970 - Image 6. August 1970. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/44/show/41.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1970). The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/44/show/41

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970 - Image 6, August 1970, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/44/show/41.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIV, No. 4, August 1970
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date August 1970
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9855
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Note Incorrect volume number, XVIV, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f007_008_006.jpg
Transcript Page 6, I talked to a man who has been studying lichens on the rocky cliffs of an island in the Potomac River for more than a decade. He informed me that the crustose lichens there have also died. All of these deaths are omens—omens that something in happening to our environment. It is a frightening prospect and one that we must be concerned about. The omens are also symptoms which are only now being recognized, at some point in time after the causative -facttupehhave had their effect. It is this fact that adds urgency to the need to detect environmental decay before such end points are reached. We know that the emission of carbon dioxide from automobiles and other kinds of oxidation processes is gradually increasing. And we are pouring pollutants at an unbelievable rate into the oceans, which not only supply a large amount of the free oxygen of the atmosphere but also have thi capability of utilizing much of the carbon dioxide. There are indications that some diatoms and other algal forms in the oceans are displaying the same sensitivity to ambient environmental changes displayed by lichens on live oaks. One stands mutely and desperately anxious at the thought of what might come to pass if we have already started an irreversible reaction whcih prevents the oceans from carrying forward their customary natural responsibilities toward life on earth. ... .Our problems of solid waste disposal, air pollution, soil pollution, deterioration are signals that cannot be ignored any longer," COMING EVENTS and landscape September 26 The Second Annual Houston Internation Underwater Film Festival, sponsored by Saturday the Houston Underwater Club, will be held at the Jones Hall for the Performing Arts, 615 Louisiana, at 2:00 and 8:00 P.M., on Saturday. Featured will be underwater movies from around the world, color and black and white salon prints, seuba and underwater photographic equipment will be on display, three salt-water aquariums filled with exotic marine life, prized collections of corals and shells. Tickets are $2.50 (matinee) and $3.50 (evening) at the Jones Hall box office, or $2.00 and $3.00 when purchased in advance at all five Foley's or from members of the Houston Underwater Club, One of the movies is on raising of 14th Century Viking Ship 'Vassa' in 100 ft. of water in Stockholm harbor, Sweden. September 27 OG Field Trip for Galveston Shore Birds. Meet at the east end of the Sea- Sunday wall at 8:00A.M, Bring lunch and mosquito repellant. Harvey Patton will be the leader. DEFINITIONS OF SOME ENVIRONMENTAL TERMS Texas Parks and Wildlefe News Notes Environment Quite simply, environment means "surroundings." This includes the living and non-living things which affect our daily lives. It is the surroundings themselves which are complex because literally millions of relationships between living and non-living things have been formed over the millions of years life has existed on earth. These relationships are commonly called the "balance of nature". Through altering the environment, man has disrupted these relationships that form our environment. Ecology Although it has been around for a long time, this word has just recently gained meaning for the broad segment of society. Ecology is the study of living things in relation to their environment. The study of ecology is a significant change from the type of studies which have dominated science for years. Science for the most part has been concerned with altering or "Improving" the environment rather that rrying to find ways of living with it. The problems we have today are an environmental backlash in part due to this "subdue and conquer" approach to nature. Biosphere The biosphere is that'thin zone of air and soil on earth, and for all we know right now is the only one in the universe, which will support life„ Earth is probably unique among the planets around our sun to have such a livable zone, but we may be changing that condition rapidly. Ecosystem All living and non-living things acting upon each other form an ecosystem. Ecocatastrophe This is a new word coined after the Santa Barbaras oil blow-out, but there are other examples. An ecocatastrophe is a 'cataclysmic disruption of the