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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970 - Image 5. August 1970. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/44/show/40.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1970). The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/44/show/40

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970 - Image 5, August 1970, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/44/show/40.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 4, August 1970
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIV, No. 4, August 1970
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date August 1970
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9855
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Note Incorrect volume number, XVIV, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f007_008_005.jpg
Transcript Page 5. CLEARING HOUSE, Cont'd. Dickcissel: (3)3,8,(2)4,7,(1)7 days, Cove, AKM, Sparrow, Seasides (2)17, Cove, AKM, UNFORTUNATE OMISSION: FLICKER, YELLOW-SHAFTED: (1)13, Baytown, NB, CONTRIBUTORS TO THE CLEARING HOUSE AKM Arlie K. McKay DHH Dan H. Hardy NP Noel Pettingell SW Steve Williams D&DL David and Dorothy Lefkovits NB Nettie Busby ADDITION TO THE JUNE CLEARING HOUSE GREBE, EARED: (1)20, Ruddy Duck Pond (E. of Sweetwater Lake), Harvey Patton CLEARING HOUSE NOTES: Steve Williams reported that he has seen the White-Tailed Kite all summer. Mr. McKay writes: "Within my memory the Snow and Blue Geese began to fail to segregate in spring migration. They are hybridizing. Some say they are on species as a result of integration in their nesting areas. An amateur can distinguish them upward of a mile away. Some are able to seperate them in the dark by plucking their breasts, or by color of the skin when all feathers are removed, or by the taste of the cooked birds. Things that differ are not equal," PERSPECTIVE OH DOOMSDAY Through the kindness of Mr. Russell Clapper the editors received a copy of the speech presented liy-HHOlm S. Gottschalk, Director, Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, U.S. Department of the Interior, at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Fontana Conservation Roundup, Fontana Dam, N,C, May 15, 1970, The following are quotes from this speech: "Environmental problems that we recognize today point directly to questions of human survival. No thinking person can set aside the fact that modern-day conservation must ignore the parts in favor of the whole. It is global conservation—there is no other way—not so long as pollutants originating in our east coast mosquito marshes are recovered in the penquins of the Antartic—and the smoke pall over Pittsburgh today cloicta tie skies of other cities on other days. We people in the wildlife conservation business like to think that the public in finally, talking about things that we have been talking about for years. I remember the early work of Dr, Cottam and Dr, Linduska on the effect of DDT spraying in forests in the«>ffi?^2S*f'_'- vicinity of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center 25 years ago. Since then we have been able to document the effect of DDT and may other kinds of.pesticide pollutants on fish and wildlife, and only last year succeeded in tracking down the complicated physiological chains which lead to the failure of reproduction in some wild birds. This aspect of environmental damage is reasonably well documented. Most everyone knows now about the decline of the bald eagle and the precipitous decrease in numbers of the peregrine falcon. And we have all heard about the lady who refused to breast feed.her infant when she learned that the DDT content in mother's milk was higher than the minlm-m tolerances allowed by the Food and Drug Administration for cow's milk. We know about the prospective doom of the brown pelican: its disappearance on the western gulf coast and its near-complete failure to produce hatchable eggs in California last year. Only 5 young hatched from over 1,200 nests, and eggshell thickness was only 50 percent of normal. We know from work on other species that DDT and other chlorinated hydrocarbons can interfere with calcium metabolism in ways to prevent normal eggshell formation. This appears to be a valid explanation of the breeding failure of Brown pelicans on Anacapa Island, California, A few weeks ago on Sapelo Island in Georgia, I was shocked to learn that all the Spanish moss on the oak trees on that island is dead. More alarming is the report that it is either dead or dying throughout most of its range. Back in Washington a few days later,